Fitted for Hard Times (1 of 3)

Please read Matthew 10:1-15 in your Bible.  Part One: The Conditions of Discipleship

Fitted for Hard Times (1)Image by James Best, (C) 2020, https://www.behance.net/gallery/90621713/Sermon-Illustrations-2020

In the white collar world of professional businessmen, there has been a lot of popular press written on the subject of leadership.  In the Bible, a lot is said about discipleship and service.  How’s that for an illustration of the clash of cultures?

The subject of discipleship, of training and being trained in following Jesus, is so important we’ll devote the next three weeks to studying Jesus’ method of discipleship in Matthew 10.  It is a rich vein of teaching, so we are going to sink a deep shaft into it.

To stimulate our thinking, it want to share a few insights into the subject of discipleship, representing varied viewpoints.

Nineteenth century Danish theologian Soren Kierkagaard wrote, “I went into church and sat on the velvet pew. I watched as the sun came shining through the stained glass windows. The minister dressed in a velvet robe opened the golden gilded Bible, marked it with a silk bookmark and said, “If any man will be my disciple, said Jesus, let him deny himself, take up his cross, sell what he has, give it to the poor, and follow me.”  Kierkagaard’s comment?  “And no one laughed.”

The reformer Martin Luther wrote, “A religion that gives nothing, costs nothing, and suffers nothing, is worth nothing.”

American evangelist Dwight L. Moody said, “It is better to train ten people than to do the work of ten people. But it is harder.”

These three men all observed, in their different ways, the essential nature of discipleship in the Christian life.  Real belief is manifest in spiritual growth, as haphazard as it may look from the outside.  There is no choice in this matter; Jesus’ followers are disciples or they follow someone else.

CONTEXT: In Matthew 9, Jesus has called Matthew to be a disciple.  He is the last one to be called to follow Jesus.  Then, at the end of the chapter, Jesus looked compassionately on the crowd gathered before Him and urged His disciples to pray to the Lord of the Harvest for more workers in the field.  These two chapters have a focus on Jesus’ disciples, His partners in ministry.

Jesus prepared His disciples for service and witness.

  1. To be a disciple you must first be named as one of His people (vs. 2-4).

The Twelve are named four times in the New Testament.  The four lists are here in Matthew 10, Mark 3:13-19; Luke 6:12-16; Acts 1:13; there is no listing in John.

This is the only time in Matthew and Mark they are called APOSTLES. The word itself has a specific meaning: “messenger, envoy, ambassador.”  Hebrews 13:1 refers to Jesus as an APOSTLE.

When the word came into use as a title for a church officer, its meaning widened.  At first, only the Twelve were called Apostles.  Then Paul and five others were called APOSTLES.  Then leaders over groups of churches got the title.

Regardless of one’s title, every believer is first called by God.  We are saved because God decided to offer salvation to us.  Here are some general observations about the original twelve Apostles.

– The Twelve were all laymen; there were no priests among them.

– They were not chosen because they gave Jesus any advantage.

– They were a mix of personalities w/ some opposites.  (For example, the opposing political views of Matthew the tax collector versus Simon the Zealot, the opposite personalities of Peter and the “Sons of Thunder” versus “Doubting Thomas.”)

– They were called to follow Jesus, they didn’t volunteer.  Some of Jesus’ followers did volunteer, but they are not called APOSTLES.

The Apostles were ordinary men whom God empowered to extra-ordinary things.  They were so important to the plan of God that Revelation 21:14 tells us that the foundation stones of the heavenly city are inscribed with their names!

  1. To be a disciple you must come under Jesus’ authority (v. 1)

JESUS CALLED HIS DISCIPLES TO HIM: Jesus, under the guidance of the Holy Spirit, called each of these men individually.  It was His decision that made them disciples; it was their decision to accept.

To be CALLED is to be invited by God to accept His will.  Everyone is CALLED to be saved.  In 2 Peter 2:9 we are told it is God’s will that no one should perish, that all should repent.  This is a universal calling.

Those who accept God’s call to salvation receive an additional calling to do a specific kind of ministry in a specific time and place.  In the modern Church we have mistakenly used the language of “calling” for professional church leaders.  That is unbiblical.  All disciples are CALLED to minister for Jesus.

HE…GAVE THEM AUTHORITY = On this occasion, Jesus delegated to the Twelve His AUTHORITY to do two things in particular.  One: TO DRIVE OUT EVIL (“unclean”) SPIRITS.  These spirits are in opposition to God.  They do evil and tempt people to do evil.  They were to be driven out because their evil is toxic to humans, separating their victims from God.

Two: TO HEAL EVERY DISEASE AND ILLNESS.  As Jesus gave the Twelve AUTHORITY to do these two different things, it is plain that not every physical illness is a result of demonic activity.  Matthew Henry’s comment is good: “The design of the gospel is to conquer the devil and cure the world.”  Last week we saw Jesus doing both these things in Luke 4.

On other occasions (i.e., Matthew 19:28) Jesus’ delegated authority would take other forms.  What’s important for us here is to note that His disciples do not exercise their own authority.  Instead, they minister under His.

  1. As a disciple you must do service and witness at the same time (vs. 5-8).

Jesus sent out the Twelve after giving them INSTRUCTIONS.  This is a potent word, used in a variety of situations: the commands given by military leaders to their subordinates, the rules or principles given by a teacher to their students, and the word of a king or emperor as laws put upon the people.

This emphasis on service and witness means the object of ministry is not self or other believers, but others, and particularly the LOST.  In this case Jesus’ command was to minister only to their fellow Jews: the Gentiles and Samaritans would be reached at another time.  Jesus’ command to GO… TO THE LOST SHEEP OF ISRAEL fulfilled the Old Testament promises that a Messiah would be sent to Israel.  This is an example to us that ministry is not about gratifying self, but is focused on meeting the needs of others.

Our ministry of witness is to PREACH…THE KINGDOM OF HEAVEN IS NEAR.  Repentance is the response for which we’re aiming as we witness, because repentance is necessary for salvation (Mark 6:12).  THE KINGDOM OF HEAVEN refers to the people of God, distinguished by true faith.

To say t KINGDOM is NEAR means two things.  One, it is close enough to be recognized by those who have faith and the Spirit to see it.  Two, that a decision is demanded: don’t procrastinate.  The KINGDOM is NEAR in time; the opportunity to join it is now.

Our ministry of service is to relieve all kinds of distress.  SICK…DEAD…LEPROSY…DEMONS are a representative sample of all the kinds of ills human beings can suffer.  Jesus gave His disciples AUTHORITY over them all!  Following the example of the Apostles, we are to provide the material and spiritual service that results in healing other’s suffering.  The Apostles returned later and testified that they had received power to accomplish these works of service.

Witness and service are to be given generously.  As Jesus said, “FREELY YOU HAVE RECEIVED, FREELY GIVE.”  God gives to us with grace and generosity; it reveals a lot about the true state of our faith when we don’t show that same kind of grace and generosity to others.  In this, the apostles were to follow God’s example and thereby set an example for us to follow.  This instruction also helps us avoid the temptation to build our own ”empire” instead of building God’s Kingdom.

  1. As a disciple you must depend on God, not yourself (vs. 9-11).

This requires you to not trust in your worldly resources.  There is a personal reason Jesus gave this command: the Apostles were to trust God to provide for their material needs.  To teach them this, Jesus instructed them to take no provisions for themselves: no money, no bag for carrying an extra tunic or sandals, nor even a staff.  If they took it along, they were depending on their own resources, not on God.  The phrase TAKE ALONG meant “procure.”  It was about going out to get all the stuff a person might need for a life on the road.

Jesus had a theological reason for this teaching.  If you and I do only the things we know we can do, then we get the glory.  On the other hand, if we do the things that only God could do, He gets the glory.

Jesus had two practical reasons.  First, if you know you’re going to depend on others for all your material needs, you have an obvious motive for ministry.  If your next meal depends on you witnessing, you’ve got some urgency in your belly that doesn’t depend on “willpower.”

Second, this was a short-term “training” mission, not an extended trip.  They were not going to the Gentiles or Samaritans.  There was no need for the extensive preparations that a lengthier journey would require.  Ministry was the priority.

Disciples trust God to equip them through the people He has prepared.  Notice the principle behind Jesus’ instruction in vs. 9-11: worthiness.  The worker is a worthy person.  FOR THE WORKER IS WORTHY OF HIS KEEP.  Those who sacrifice themselves to do the work of ministry deserve our support.

The worker is to search for a WORTHY PERSON to supply His needs and stick with them.  The worthiness of this person would be spirituality first and material support second.  Also, because the Apostles would be associating with that person throughout their stay, their worthiness would be measured by their reputation in the community: would association with them help or hinder their witness?  Jesus told them to STAY AT HIS HOUSE UNTIL YOU LEAVE.  It would be tempting to “trade up” to a nicer house or better food, but that would be ungrateful to someone who’d been generous and might have impaired the reputation of the Apostles.

  1. As a disciple you must practice peace and judgment (vs. 11-15).

Begin new relationships with peace, but be prepared to render judgment.  Remember that the home in this example belongs to a WORTHY PERSON, so it is reasonable to expect a peaceful greeting.

The first step, then, is to give the household a peaceful GREETING (12).  In Jewish culture, that was “Peace to this house” or “Shalom.”

The second step was determined by the response of the household.  If they responded to the greeting of PEACE with PEACE, then they were deserving of PEACE.  In that case, the Apostles were to STAY AT THAT HOUSE until they left, and allow their PEACE to REST ON IT too.

On the other hand, if they responded to the greeting of PEACE by not welcoming them or not listening to them (v. 14), then the Apostles were to LET their PEACE RETURN to them and shake the dust of that house or town off their feet.  In Jewish culture, shaking the dust off one’s feet or clothing was a nonverbal curse (Nehemiah 5:13; Acts 18:6).  For example, it was their habit to shake the dust off before entering Gentile lands so as not to carry any of the soil of the Promised Land with them.  Before leaving Gentile lands, they would shake the dust off to avoid bringing any of that unclean soil with them into the Promised Land.  This was a curse that would come to pass ON THE DAY OF JUDGMENT.

Realize that not everyone will accept your witness and service.  These instructions make the most sense when we remember Jesus was preparing His disciples for the possibility of rejection and acceptance.  He was sending them out of the safety of their group and the world was as likely to show them the back of its hand as offer a hand in fellowship.

His other purpose is to demonstrate this is serious business.  To reject God’s ambassadors is a rejection of God; to reject God is to put one’s self under a curse that will come to full and deadly fruition on Judgment Day.  As Jesus explained in verse 40, “HE WHO RECEIVES YOU RECEIVES ME, AND HE WHO RECEIVES ME RECEIVES THE ONE WHO SENT ME.”

Though we come peaceably to witness and serve, there is no guarantee we will be received peaceably.  When people make up their own minds, their response is their responsibility, not ours.

Jesus prepared His disciples for service and witness.

We observed earlier the Twelve were called to follow Jesus, they did not volunteer.  The difference between the two is instructive:

  • Disciples surrender their rights in service to their master, but volunteers retain their rights and some are quite likely to bellyache at perceived violations of their rights.
  • Discipleship is an act of complete self-sacrifice while volunteers offer only a portion of their resources, often what they can easily spare.
  • Discipleship is a way of life while volunteerism is more like a hobby; something we enjoy but is not central to our survival or growth.
  • Disciples live to serve while volunteers expect to be rewarded for their service.

While it is true that the church needs workers, God calls all of us to be disciples.  The difference between the two makes all the difference.  A person can be a volunteer in the church without being a disciple, but a disciple will always be a gracious volunteer.

 

Part Two: The Cost of Discipleship

Part Three: The Courage to be a Disciple

 

RESOURCES:

Message #1321

http://www.sermonillustrations.com/a-z/d/discipleship.htm

The Matthew Henry Commentary, Matthew Henry

Pursuant to Peace

peas

Please read Psalm 34.

Peace comes to those who pursue it.

          In days gone by, a young boy was driving a hayrack down the road when the wagon fell over.  It tipped backwards right in front of a farmer’s house. The farmer came out, saw the young boy crying and said, ”Son, don’t worry about this, we can fix it. Right now dinner’s ready: Why don’t you come in and eat and then I’ll help you put the hay back on the rack.”
The boy said, ”No, I can’t. My father is going to be angry with me.”

Trying to soothe the boy, the farmer said, ”Now don’t worry, just come in and have some lunch and you’ll feel better.”

The boy said, ”I’m just afraid my father is going to be very angry with me.”
The farmer finally convinced the boy and they went inside to eat lunch. Afterwards, as they walked outside to the hayrack, the farmer said, ”Now, son, don’t you feel better after that great meal?”
The boy said, ”Yes but I just know that my father will be very angry with me.”

The farmer said, ”Nonsense. Where is your father anyway?” The boy said, ”He’s under all that hay.”
CONTEXT = According to the heading, this was NOT a peaceful time in David’s life.  It refers to a time when he was being pursued by King Saul, who really was crazy and wanted to kill David.  In 1 Samuel 21, David pretended to be crazy so he would get kicked out of a city rather than be put in custody and fall into Saul’s hands.  The fact that David could write a song about peace during a time like that says a lot about the depth of his spiritual life.

COMMENT = Four points to be made in looking at the psalm from the peace-making perspective.

  1. Pursue peace by continuous praise. (1-3)

“Continuous Praise” is indicated in verse one.  The words ALL TIMES and ALWAYS clearly indicate worship is not limited to Sunday mornings but is meant to be a feature of daily life.  This virtue is challenging to practice; indeed, it would be impossible to do without the Holy Spirit.  Consider this: doesn’t a life of praise make sense if we are truly grateful for what God has done for us?  Wouldn’t praise come to mind more often if our focus is truly on God?

“Continuous Praise” is also indicated in the verbs in verses one to three.  There’s little difference between these words; they are synonyms.  And yet, they are all here in God’s inspired word, presumably to give us a full-featured definition of continuous praise.

EXTOL = “bless, praise, give thanks.”

PRAISE = “glorify; tell of God’s excellence; an act of worship.”

BOAST = “cheer; display positives.”

REJOICE = “be glad, delighted, happy.”

GLORIFY = “make great; honor; lift up.”

EXALT = “express pride; raise up.”

  1. Pursue peace by praying for divine deliverance. (3-7, 17, 19-22)

God answers all prayers. Note the personal pronouns in vs. 4-7; David speaks here from personal experience.  May all of us have this quality of personal experience of God.  I SOUGHT THE LORD: Jesus commended seekers in Matthew 7:7-8, promising a successful outcome to their search for God.  Deniers and evil-doers have no hope.  HE ANSWERED ME: there is no such thing as “unanswered prayer;” God always answers, even if it is “Hold please.”  THOSE WHO LOOK TO HIM: people who look to the LORD expectantly have sound reason to hope and be satisfied.  THIS POOR MAN CALLED AND THE LORD HEARD HIM: David thought of himself as a POOR MAN and even so, the LORD HEARD his prayer.  THE RIGHTEOUS CRY OUT, AND THE LORD HEARS THEM (17) = RIGHTEOUS folks have good reason to hope the LORD hears and heeds their prayers because they are His children.

God delivers those who seek Him.  The psalm is rife with promises of deliverance.  HE DELIVERED ME FROM ALL MY FEARS (3): Worry is one of the two big opponents of peace.  Anxiety is surrendering our God-given peace without a fight.  They are RADIANT (5): what a great picture of joy!  Those who know the Lord have reason to have a certain “glow” about them.  They are unashamed (5): whether it’s true of false, guilt is also a roadblock to peace.  The righteous are SAVED from all their troubles (6+17+19): if we stop and think about it, we can all testify to God’s deliverance from something.  They are protected by God’s angels (7): Angels operate inconspicuously, so we are most often unaware of their assistance.  But many believers can recount a time when the received some kind of miraculous assistance.  None of their bones will be broken (20): in John 19:36, this promise is seen a prophecy fulfilled at Jesus’ crucifixion.  In general, it is a metaphor of God’s care for His people.  THE LORD REDEEMS HIS SERVANTS (22): to REDEEM someone was to buy them out of slavery.  This image was taken up by Paul in the New Testament as a way of explaining how Jesus saved us.  NO ONE…WHO TAKES REFUGE IN HIM…WILL BE CONDEMNED (22): looking ahead to Judgment Day and in agreement with Paul in RMS 8:1, those who trust in God will escape His wrath.

WICKED people are slain by the EVIL they practice (21).  Life in this world and the next can be understood as choices and consequences.  Justice will be done.

  1. Pursue peace by trusting God’s provision. (8-10)

God provides more than refuge for those who take refuge in Him (8+22).  The word REFUGE implies a place apart from the pressures and problems of life; a spiritual retreat from the world to rest in God and commit ourselves to Him.

God’s goodness can be tasted and His provision proven (8).  To “taste” something means to have a real and personal experience of God.  Merely agreeing with a set of Bible teachings is not the sum total of faith.  God must be known in one’s head and heart.

The LORD’S saints LACK NOTHING (9).  Hearing that, we might be tempted to list all the things we feel we’re lacking right at the moment – that’s human nature.  Truth be told, God provides all we need all our lives.

Even LIONS can get famished, but people who seek the LORD will LACK NO GOOD THING (10).  The LIONS here in verse ten are a metaphor for rich or strong people; those who have much in worldly terms but are poor in the things of God.

  1. Pursue peace by righteous living. (11-20)

Aspects of righteous living in these verses include fear of the Lord, virtuous speech, seeking peace, and having full-featured godliness (avoids evil and does good).  FEAR THE LORD (9+11): In Proverbs, fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom.  FEAR refers to awe and reverence, but it also includes the kind of wary respect that the all-powerful Creator of the universe deserves.  KEEP YOUR TONGUE FROM EVIL AND YOUR LIPS FROM SPEAKING LIES (13): of all kinds of sin, sins of the tongue are the most pervasive and the most overlooked.  They are the quickest way to ruin peaceful relationships.  TURN FROM EVIL AND DO GOOD (14) are the two sides of righteousness.  Some folks pride themselves on the obvious evil they don’t do and mistakenly believe they have exercised their duty to God.  However, the truth is, that’s only half of being a godly person.  When we fail to do good, that’s sin.

SEEK PEACE AND PURSUE IT (14).  This is our keynote verse on this Peace Sunday.  Peace is something God gives to those who promote it; who are peacemakers, not peace-breakers or peace-fakers. To PURSUE something indicates a deep commitment, a motive to work at it and perseverance to stick with it.

Psalm 34 promises six rewards for righteous living.  Long life (12) may not mean living to old age, for the unrighteous do that.  It more likely refers to a quality of life, a blessing of one’s days.  The LORD is sensitive to the righteous (15+17): God’s EYES and EARS are sensitive to the plight of His people.  Their suffering is not lost on Him.  The LORD is against the unrighteous (16). According to Matthew 7:23, God will turn away from all evil people, saying, “I NEVER KNEW YOU.  AWAY FROM ME, YOU EVILDOERS.”  According to verse eighteen, the LORD saves hurting people.  The words BROKENHEARTED and CRUSHED IN SPIRIT describe people who look honestly on their flaws and troubles.  They are not defeated by them, but neither are they able to find victory in their own strength.  Instead, as this psalm repeatedly says, they trust in the Lord for the strength to overcome trials and temptations.  Deliverance from all troubles (4, 17+19): the word deliverance is used a lot in this psalm.  In His grace, God lifts us out of our discouragements, giving us victory.  Physical protection (20) is a metaphor of surviving this world, being delivered whole into God’s eternal presence.

Peace comes to those who pursue it.

          Norman Vincent Peale said, ”The word ‘worry’ is derived from an Old Anglo-Saxon word meaning to strangle or to choke. How well-named the emotion – it has been demonstrated again and again in persons who have lost their effectiveness due to the stifling effect of anxiety and apprehension.
A story is told about a man who came face to face with the dangers of worry: Death was walking toward his city one morning and the man asked, ”What are you going to do?”
”I’m going to take 100 people,” Death replied.

”That’s horrible!” the man said.
”That’s the way it is,” Death said. ”That’s what I do.”
The man hurried to warn everyone he could about Death’s plan. As evening fell, he met Death again in the same spot outside the city limits.
”You told me you were going to take 100 people,” the man said. ”Why did 1,000 die?”
”I kept my word,” Death responded. ”I only took 100 people. Worry took the others.”

Our peace can be threatened and broken by others; we have no control over them.  What we can directly manage is our own inner state.  Peace is something we receive by faith because we are God’s children.  There are some things we can do to preserve and promote peace within ourselves, then encourage it in others.

  • Most importantly, forsake worry. Trust in God instead.  Anxieties occur when we don’t trust God to keep all the promises in His word.
  • Second, forsake anger. An over-emphasis on self promotes anger, so spend your days in continuous praise and your temper will improve.
  • Third, guard your tongue. Your own peace is disrupted and the peace of others threatened when your tongue is too loose in your head and you say ungodly things.
  • Fourth, pursue peace. Your devotion to peace will be measured by the things you give up to possess it.  A God-centered heart will pursue peace instead of railing about one’s rights.
  • Fifth, seek justice. Treat others right and expect right treatment from them.  Work to see justice practiced in your home and in our community.  Let love guide you.

 

RESOURCES:

The Daily Study Bible Series, George A.F. Knight

The Expositor’s Bible Commentary, Willem A. VanGemeren

Zondervan NIV Exhaustive Concordance

https://www.sermonsearch.com/sermon-outlines/22695/finding-peace-in-anxious-times/

 

“A Fool and His Money”

(Please read Luke 12:13-21 in your preferred version of the Bible.  I used the NIV to prepare these remarks.)

Today we’ll start with a simple quiz: Who said the following?  “I TELL YOU, USE WORLDLY WEALTH TO GAIN FRIENDS FOR YOURSELVES, SO THAT WHEN IT IS GONE, YOU WILL BE WELCOMED INTO ETERNAL DWELLINGS.”

It may surprise you to know that these are the words of Jesus.  Look it up: he said this in Luke 16:9.  As is the case with many of the things Jesus taught, this is contrary to worldly wisdom.  I’m sure you’d have a hard time finding a financial advisor who will recommend using money to GAIN FRIENDS.  Note that Jesus did not suggest “buying” friends.  Instead, He’s suggesting that generosity is a way of showing grace and making friends.

That part shows an understanding of human nature.  Nothing very surprising here.  It’s the concluding statement that is particularly radical as Jesus connects generosity with eternal life.  Of course Jesus is NOT saying that we can spend our way into heaven.  What He is affirming is that people who are saved, who will be WELCOMED INTO ETERNAL DWELLINGS, are marked by a generous nature.

Some folks want to draw a dark line between money and faith, but that is not biblical teaching.  The Bible teaches that all of the resources God entrusts to us are to be used in obedience to God.  This is called “stewardship” and is an important part of being a follower of Jesus Christ.

MESSAGE: It is foolish to put your trust in any worldly thing.

  1. Jesus the Unwilling Judge (vs. 13-15).

The man in the crowd asked Jesus to act as a rabbi, but he had an ulterior motive: GREED (13).  He called Jesus “TEACHER.”  In that culture, rabbis were often asked to settle disputes like this.  The rabbi’s authority would be ethical, not legal.

The man was not at all subtle.  He practically orders Jesus to take his side in the dispute about an estate; “TELL MY BROTHER TO DIVIDE THE INHERITANCE WITH ME.”

Jesus was unwilling to judge between them (14).  Jesus did not disagree with the man about His being a teacher, but protests that no one has agree to Him acting as a JUDGE OR ARBITER between this man and his brother.  No agreement of arbitration has been struck.  The man’s request is entirely one-sided.  He’s asking Jesus to use his authority to come down on his side.

Instead, Jesus turned the moment into a teaching as He turned from the man to address the CROWD (15).  He warned the man; “WATCH OUT!  BE ON YOUR GUARD AGAINST ALL KINDS OF GREED.”  In so doing, Jesus exposed the man’s true motive.  This is an emphatic, emotional appeal on Jesus’ part: “WATCH OUT!  BE ON YOUR GUARD.”  He kept it universal: “ALL KINDS OF GREED.”  GREED is a sin.

– It is defined in the Bible as an insatiable desire for any earthly thing.

– Its flaw is that earthly things take t place of God in our life.

– In Colossians 3:5, GREED is listed among other sins that come from a person’s EARTHLY NATURE and is condemned as IDOLATRY.

GREED can quickly ruin relationships.  Indeed, the experience is so common that I would not be surprised if everyone in this room has observed it personally.   It often happens in situations just like this one; disputes over inheritance drive grieving family members apart.

I believe that is what Jesus implied in the condemnation of the rich man in v. 20; “WHO WILL GET WHAT YOU HAVE PREPARED FOR YOURSELF?”  Jesus didn’t just lay down the law; He instructed the man in the moral reason why he should guard against greed.  He said, “A MAN’S LIFE DOES NOT CONSIST IN THE ABUNDANCE OF HIS POSSESSIONS.”

  1. Jesus the Story-teller (vs. 16-21).

A parable is a story told to make a point.  The details are only important as they contribute to that one main point.  The main point of the parable is that it is foolish to put your trust in anything from this world.  Let’s take a look at how the parable develops that theme.

Externally, the rich man did nothing wrong.  From a moral standpoint, he did not steal to become wealthy. V. 16: THE GROUND…PRODUCED A GOOD CROP.  From a business standpoint, the rich man’s decisions make a certain amount of sense.  Vs. 17-18: I WILL TEAR DOWN MY BARNS AND BUILD BIGGER ONES.  From a worldly standpoint, you can’t blame him for his confidence about the future.  V. 19: “TAKE LIFE EASY; EAT, DRINK AND BE MERRY” sounds an awful lot like the goal of retirement planning.  In fact, I expect that by this point in the story, people in the audience are smiling, nodding in agreement, may be saying “AMEN!”

But internally, God knows our hearts and He knew that the rich man was not merely a good businessman; he was a practical – if not actual – atheist.  The rich man makes no mention of God in vs. 17-19.  He neither expresses gratitude to God, nor does he make plans to share his wealth with God or with people in need.  The rich man in this parable acts in line with his sin nature; he is only concerned about himself.  There is no accountability to God or even tradition, much less others.

This character is condemned in v. 20.  God called him a FOOL.  In the Old Testament, a fool is a person who rejects God and does self-destructive things (for example, Psalm 14:1).  It is a very strong condemnation with the word only used twice in the New Testament.

God warned him that his wealth could not save him from imminent death.  The word for LIFE here is psyche i/t Gk and is often translated as “soul.”  Jesus has set up a contrast between the inner life of the man and the outward life.  He’s saying, “Your attention is all focused on your external life, but your internal life will soon be taken away and you will die!”

God condemned his selfishness, asking him who would end up possessing the wealth he thought was his.  This man thought he had created his own future, but God appeared to remind him who was really in charge.

Jesus made His point plain in v. 21: anyone who shares the rich man’s attitude will also share his outcome.  The problem is not wealth.  The Bible does not commend or condemn having material things.  Instead, the rich man condemned in the parable was judged guilty of having sought wealth over God.

In MTW 6:19-21, Jesus made it clear where our priorities should lie: “DO NOT STORE UP FOR YOURSELVES TREASURES ON EARTH, WHERE MOTH AND RUST DESTROY, AND WHERE THIEVES BREAK IN AND STEAL.  BUT STORE UP FOR YOURSELVES TREASURES IN HEAVEN, WHERE MOTH AND RUST DO NOT DESTROY AND WHERE THIEVES DO NOT BREAK IN AND STEAL.  FOR WHERE YOUR TREASURE IS, THERE YOUR HEART WILL BE ALSO.”

This Bible passage was written for everyone who ever thought, “If I just had more money.”  It’s for people who look for security in a bank account or compounding their possessions.

And we’re not just talking about the obvious ones, the hoarders, the greedy, the thieves and cheats.  We’re talking about the folks who may have legitimate-sounding goals like providing for their retirement or their family.  Whether obvious or not, the point is that you can’t trust worldly things to provide security or happiness or peace.  The man’s prudence is not condemned, only his godlessness.

Trust in God only.

Let me tell you what money is.  It is a tool.  Like a hammer, money is a tool.  It has a specific purpose but it has absolutely no ethical nature.  It is a thing that can be used to build or to destroy.  The only ethical part of it is how it is used.

If you want to drive a nail, then a hammer is the right choice of tools.  If you want to paint a wall, then I doubt it’s going to work very well for you.

Here’s the thing: If someone told you they absolutely loved hammers, that they collected hammers and wanted as many hammers as they could get, that they researched hammers on Google and Ebay, that they felt most secure in their showroom of hammers, then I don’t think you’d wait too long to wonder if they were nuts.  If they told you that the person with the most hammers will live eternally, you’d stop wondering and conclude they were nuts!

Darrell L. Bock wrote, “The fundamental test for the use of resources is whether they become tools of service that benefit others and enable them to be in a position to serve God better.”  (Bock, the NIV Application Commentary on Luke, Zondervan Publishing House, 1996, pp. 345-346.)

So why take that same approach to another tool, money?  Why covet it, collect it, try to be consoled by having lots of it, why waste your life worrying about it?  It’s just a tool, one of many God has placed in your tool box.

Get over it.

Here’s the attitude God wants us to have toward money and all material things:

#1 = Agree with God that everything is HIS.  The notion that we’ve earned it or otherwise deserve it is an illusion.

#2 = Trust God that He will provide what you need when you need it.  Find your security – true security – in Him.

#3 = Give to God first, not the leftovers.

– Start with a cheerful and worshipful attitude.

– Give proportionately.  Set a percentage; that is your TITHE.

– Give generously.  In addition to your TITHE, make GIFTS or OFFERINGS that provide for organizational & individual need.

– Give sacrificially.  Anyone can give leftovers or out of their excess, but only sacrificial giving – giving when it is not convenient or even hurts a bit – that is the only kind of giving that shows our love is real.

#4 = Be careful.  Jesus spoke more often about money than any other subject because he knew it is a window into the soul of a person.  Their attitude about money quickly reveals what’s truly most important to us.