When Family Fails

Sons of Noah

CONTEXT = We generally have a high opinion of Noah.  This opinion is well-founded, as the Bible testifies to Noah’s standing in the eyes of the Lord.  Here are some examples of biblical testimony about Noah.

Genesis 6:8-9 = BUT NOAH FOUND FAVOR IN THE EYES OF THE LORD.  THIS IS THE ACCOUNT OF NOAH.  NOAH WAS A RIGHTEOUS MAN, BLAMELESS AMONG THE PEOPLE OF HIS TIME, AND HE WALKED WITH GOD.

Genesis 7:1 = THE LORD THEN SAID TO NOAH, “GO INTO THE ARK, YOU AND YOUR WHOLE FAMILY, BECAUSE I HAVE FOUND YOU RIGHTEOUS IN THIS GENERATION.”

Genesis 9:1 = THEN GOD BLESSED NOAH AND HIS SONS, SAYING TO THEM, “BE FRUITFUL AND INCREASE IN NUMBER AND FILL THE EARTH.”

Noah is mentioned in the “Faith Hall of Fame in Hebrews 11:7, where it is written, BY FAITH NOAH, WHEN WARNED ABOUT THINGS NOT YET SEEN, IN HOLY FEAR BUILT AN ARK TO SAVE HIS FAMILY.  BY HIS FAITH HE CONDEMNED THE WORLD AND BECAME HEIR OF THE RIGHTEOUSNESS THAT COMES BY FAITH.

And so we find today’s passage a little shocking and disconcerting.

Please read Genesis 9:18-29.

          Now be careful.  There’s good information here even if it comes from a cracked pot.

One proof that the Bible is true is that it is completely honest about its heroes.  They are not paragons of perfection, but are fallible human beings.  They sin and are forgiven again and again, just like we are.  This fact alone should make them more accessible to us, more relatable as people.

More good news – God forgave Noah and blessed Noah just as He’d promised He would. We all mess up.  We fall into sin, have errors of judgment, and often inflict our worst behavior on our family members.  God is not done with you, so get over yourself, get forgiven, and get moving forward!

When we fail at being family, there must be room for forgiveness and restoration that causes our relationships to improve.  Today we look at a negative example, people who failed as family.  May we learn from their mistakes and not repeat them in our own family!

Our family deserves our best behavior.

  1. Noah got “three sheets to the wind,” minus the sheets! (18-21)

In vs. 18-19 we are re-introduced to Noah’s three sons (first mention: 7:13).  The author takes pains to point out two important facts.  One, Ham was the father of Canaan.  (This fact may be a reason this account is included in the Bible.)  These three sons are the “fathers” of all the people who were – in ch. 11 – SCATTERED OVER THE EARTH.  There are elaborate theories about the dispersion of the peoples across the earth – suffice it to say everyone alive is a descendant of one of the three sons of Noah.

Noah is described as A MAN OF THE SOIL in v. 20.  This is new information.  Previously, we’ve only seen his carpentry skills.  This item is offered to explain why he planted a vineyard in the first place.

Apparently some time passed between verses 20 and 21.  According to an article on Inc.com, it takes two years for vines to bear fruit and four years before the first bottle of fermented wine is available.  This is not a spur-of-the-moment decision by Noah, it was something into which he poured a lot of time and effort.  I mention this only because it puts the full weight of responsibility on Noah.  This was not a reaction to the stress of the whole ark incident.  It was a genuine, full-fledged mistake.  No excuses.

After four years of toil and waiting, Noah finally got to enjoy the fruit of his labors and enjoyed it too much (21).  First sin: HE BECAME DRUNK.  Drinking wine is not a sin.  For example, Psalm 104:14-15 says that God gave wine to gladden the hearts of men.  But drunkenness is a sin.  Ephesians 5:18 condemns drunkenness as it lead to all other kinds of sin.  Proverbs 20:1 calls wine a MOCKER.

Second sin: Noah passed out and LAY UNCOVERED INSIDE HIS TENT.  Recall that just six chapters earlier (2:25) Adam and Eve were both NAKED in the garden but they FELT NO SHAME.  Then they disobeyed God (3:7) and those days of innocence were replaced with shame over their nakedness. The two situations are parallel; Noah, as were our original parents, in a garden paradise.  They both sinned against God and were ashamed by their exposure.  Biblically, to get drunk and be exposed in this way was a disgrace (see Habakkuk 2:15 and Lamentations 4:21).  The grammar of the Hebrew makes it clear that Noah uncovered himself before passing out.  This was no accident; for whatever reason, Noah chose be naked.  That’s what makes this a sin, not an accident.

The three brothers reacted to the news in different ways.  We start with Ham, the troublemaker.   The Hebrew implies there was more to Ham’s reaction than mere amazement at seeing his father lying naked in his tent.  It implies Ham was somehow happy to see his father uncovered.  Medieval Jewish scholars theorized that Ham mutilated Noah or committed a homosexual act with him.  It could be Ham thought the whole episode was funny.

However you explain it, Ham went and told the “whole world” what Noah had done (22).  This is the only explanation the text supports: Ham was guilty of the sins of gossip and of disrespecting his father.  Had he simply not said a thing, this whole event would have passed peaceably.

Shem and Japheth had a more respectful attitude and devised a means to cover up their father without embarrassing him further (23).  That’s why they got the blessing and Ham got the bane.

  1. Noah got up angry and cursed Ham. (24-29).

In verses 24-25 Noah launched into a curse.  Given the usual state of a hangover, we can understand a certain amount of crankiness.  What’s not understandable is why he named Canaan, not Ham, as the object of the curse.  This is odd because the text does not name Canaan as having had anything at all to do with disrespecting Noah.

This discrepancy can be a clue into the purpose of including this account in the Bible.  The name “Canaan” should sound familiar to Bible readers.  Canaan was the set of people nations who settled on the east side of the Mediterranean Sea.  They would were a people of great wickedness.

Obviously, they are descendants of Noah’s grandson Canaan, the person Noah cursed.  Canaan was the region God gave to the Hebrews as their Promised Land.  It was the Canaanite people whom God commanded be utterly destroyed.  Therefore, a purpose of this event is to explain why God made that choice; why he took the newly-founded nation of Israel to take the Canaanites land and their lives.  Not only were they a wicked people (their sexual deviance has been revealed many times over by the archaeologist’s shovel), but they were also descended from the son Noah had cursed.

We need to look at the context to see another explanation for this discrepancy.  In verse one of this chapter it is written, THEN GOD BLESSED NOAH AND HIS SONS, SAYING TO THEM, “BE FRUITFUL AND INCREASE IN NUMBER AND FILL THE EARTH.”  Noah was aware of this blessing and knew it was folly to curse Ham when God had already blessed him.  Canaan had not enjoyed God’s blessing and could be cursed.

Verses 26-29 deal Noah’s blessing of his other sons and the end of his days. He blessed Shem.  One of Shem’s descendants was Abram, the man whom God called into the territory of the Canaanites.  He would become known as Abraham.  The offspring of Shem have come to be known as “Semites,” a name we use as synonymous with Jews.

As later chapters in Genesis will testify, God promised Abraham all the territory occupied by the Canaanites.  In the books of Exodus, Joshua, and Judges, we read how, after 400 years of slavery in Egypt, the Israelites got that land.  Incredibly, the sons of Shem were to triumph over and enslave the sons of Canaan, bringing Noah’s curse into being.

Noah also blessed Japheth, but under the blessing of Shem: “MAY JAPHETH LIVE IN THE TENTS OF SHEM.”  In the curse and blessings Noah spoke predictively; foreshadowing world changing events that started with a disrespectful son.  It’s a shame that after having cleansed the world with a flood, humanity immediately returned to its sinful ways.

In spite of all the family drama, Noah lived a supernaturally long life (28-29).  This would be a good place to clarify; just because Noah’s curse and blessings came to pass throughout the course of history, it would be a mistake to say Noah “caused” all this.  Each person and each generation makes their own choices.  Neither God nor Noah’s offspring were in any way “fated” because of Noah’s words.  Noah’s blessing and curse were as much prophecy as they were disciplinary.

This passage may seem like a poor choice of texts for Father’s Day; a sad chapter of biblical history best forgotten.  However, this text has historically been misused to justify some horrible things by making them seem biblical.

This text was used to justify African slavery.  Without any biblical reason to do so, people said that Ham and his sons were dark-skinned; therefore the curse of slavery was applied to the Negro race by Noah and was therefore legitimate.

If that sounds superficial, unbiblical, and just plain stupid, it should.  Especially on Father’s Day, I’m ashamed to say it was someone who shared my family name that first popularized this so-called “Curse of Ham.”  In 1578 a sailing captain named George Best published an account of his travels in the southern hemisphere and attempted to justify his work as a slave trader.  In that book he set forth this false teaching.

I mention this so you understand why this goofy little passage everyone overlooks needs to be scrutinized and understood.  It’s also important for us to see that choices have consequences.  Sometimes the consequences are temporary and personal; sometimes they are inter-generational and universal.

Noah sinned by getting drunk and being uncovered.  Ham sinned by gossiping and disrespecting his father.  The immediate consequence was Canaan being cursed.  The long-term consequence was all of Canaan’s descendants being enslaved by the descendants of Shem.

We tend to trivialize things, especially when we are the guilty party.  We say things like, “It was a little white lie.  Why are you making a big deal over it?”  This passage should impress us with the seriousness of all sin and the deadly consequences it can have even generations after us.

Look at it another way.  Consider something a parent or some other adult you trusted did or said that hurt you.  Forgiveness may have been offered and received, but the words are not forgotten.  Whether you repeat them or not, they affect your behavior and your behavior is repeated or avoided in the next generations.  Families are serious business!

All of this to explain and motivate us to adhere to this simple truth: Our family deserves our best behavior.  I tell you this not on the authority of an expert practitioner.  I have failed my family too often.  Instead, I tell you this on the authority of the Word of God and my calling to tell you the truth, no matter how unpleasant and unpopular it may be.

I have never preached on this passage and I would venture to say most preachers go their careers without bringing it up.  It’s like one of those “skeletons” in the family “closet,” the story we know but ignore because it’s embarrassing.  However, we ignore things like this at our peril.  We need to face it, confess it, be forgiven and do better.  That’s what we do when family fails.

 

RESOURCES:

https://www.inc.com/ss/8-steps-to-owning-your-own-vineyard

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curse_of_Ham

More Hard Sayings of the Old Testament, Walter C. Kaiser, Jr.

Expositor’s Bible Commentary, Vol. 2, John H. Sailhammer.

 

Seven Modern Maladies and their Divine Solutions (2 of 7)

Envy is a sin because it makes an idol of things.  The virtue of Contentment is based on trust in God.

Anyone OVER 50 years old needs no introduction to

Mary Ann

“Mary Ann,” a character on the TV series “Gilligan’s Island.”  Actress Dawn Wells played this character in all 98 episodes of the series.  She and Tina Louise are the only surviving members of the cast.

The character of Mary Ann is chosen as a symbol of ENVY because it was clear that she envied the beauty and glamor of the movie star character named “Ginger.”  In fact, in episode 92, “The Second Ginger Grant,” Mary Ann suffered a blow to the head and took on the persona of Ginger, wearing her clothes and acting like her.

Mary Ann’s envy of Ginger was purely a plot device and exactly at odds with reality.  Of the two, Dawn Wells was the beauty queen (Miss Nevada, 1950), she was “Gilligan’s” personal favorite, and received more than twice as much fan mail as cast mate Tina Louise.  In 2005, Wells consigned her costume for sale and it sold for $20,700!  In forty years of polls on the subject, men have expressed a preference for Mary Ann over Ginger that is 3-1 or even 4-1.  If art had imitated life, Ginger would have been envious of Mary Ann!

ENVY is one of the Seven Deadly Sins, a list formulated by the Church in medieval times.  We are examining this list and each week offering a virtue to take the place of the vice.  Today we’ll see how and why believers must replace ENVY with CONTENTMENT.

  1. The vicious vice of ENVY (Genesis 4:1-16).

What is envy?  ENVY is wanting what you don’t have, often paired with an unwillingness to wait for it or earn it.  It is a form of materialism that reflects on what others possess.

In his book, 7 Deadly Sins, the late Billy Graham wrote, “The envious man somehow feels that other people’s fortune is his misfortune, that their success is his failure and hat their blessing is his curse.” (p. 42)

Why is envy so deadly?  It puts a priority on things over God and others. An envious person values material things over persons.

It drains happiness and prevents satisfaction.  When your attention is fixed on worldly things you can never be satisfied, because the things of this world – even the good things – always end in an appetite for more.  The other thing we must learn and relearn is that the things of this world – even the good things – are temporary.  Even if they last generations, all worldly things are temporary.

Cain is a biblical example of envy’s deadliness.  When we read the account of Cain and Abel, God’s choice of Abel’s sacrifice and his rejection of Cain’s is obvious.  As the text states, GOD LOOKED WITH FAVOR ON ABEL AND HIS OFFERING (vs. 4+5).

What’s not spelled out is why. We infer the reason for God’s choice by a close reading of the text, particularly Cain’s reaction.  He became envious and angry.  So angry, in fact, he murdered his brother.  Verse six says Cain was ANGRY AND DOWNCAST.

Cain’s anger motivated him to be disrespectful and evasive when God asked him about Abel; “Am I my brother’s keeper? (v. 9)”  The best answer is “YES.”

Cain gave into envy.  He looked upon Abel’s success and wanted it too.  Abel’s sacrifice was motive by gratitude and/or love; some other God-honored motive, as seen in God’s acceptance of Abel’s sacrifice.

This was a murder that God tried to avoid.  In v. 7, God gave Cain an unusual warning: SIN IS CROUCHING AT YOUR DOOR.  He should have heeded God’s warning and dispensed with ENVY.

Cain’s consequences were isolation and failure.  Cain was sent away, separated from his parents and condemned to be a wanderer on the earth (vs. 12+14).  We don’t know what the MARK of Cain was, but it was a two-sided thing: it separated him from every other human being who had no such marking, but it also warned off anyone who might want to take revenge.  It was God saying; “This one is mine.  Leave him alone.”

We see Cain cursed to failure.  In 3:17-19, Cain’s father Adam received God’s discipline for his sin; the GROUND was CURSED because of Adam and it was only by hard work that it would yield any fruit.  Cain’s discipline is worse, in that the GROUND will never YIELD CROPS for him.

Cain later enjoyed some worldly success as an urban developer (v. 17); in fact, the Bible credits him as inventing cities. But envy destroyed his brother, his family relationships, and worst of all, estranged him from God.  ENVY is deadly; it demands to high a price and delivers only unhappiness.

2. The vital virtue of CONTENTMENT (Philippians 4:10-13).

What is contentment?  Contentment is a sense of satisfaction that exists apart from your circumstances.  It is an abiding trust in God that He will provide what is needed, when it is needed.

A contented person trusts in God’s provision, not their own.  As the song says, “Put your hope in things eternal.”  Unlike worldly things, heavenly things truly satisfy and their effects are everlasting.

Why is contentment a vital virtue? There are many reasons; here are a few.

It is God-honoring and faith-based.

It is part of a maturing faith.

It removes the distraction of materialism.

It prioritizes our relationship with God, the Source of true satisfaction.

It allows us to use things without being used by them.

Let’s look at Paul as an example of contentment.  Paul’s philosophy of financing ministry was simple: while he deserved each church’s support, he preferred not to need it.

The occasion for this letter to the church in Philippi was Paul acknowledging their gift to him, recently sent by Epaphroditus (v. 18).  Keep in mind Paul was in prison when he wrote this.  He said their gift gave him “immense joy” (v. 10).  I’m sure Paul was happy that they’d remembered him, especially in his chains.  But Paul wrote that his joy was IN THE LORD.

What’s important for our purposes was that Paul the prisoner had been content when he’d been with them and still practiced contentment while in prison!  This was because Paul had learned the SECRET of contentment in EVERY SITUATION; keeping his priorities in order.

WHETHER WELL FED OR HUNGRY was not a rhetorical comment: prisons of that day did not feed their prisoners.  Food had to be supplied by outsiders.

WHETHER LIVING IN PLENTY OR IN WANT is one way of summarizing Paul’s life.  The Apostle Paul had been born into a wealthy family, but since accepting God’s call on his life, there had been lots of occasions for being in need, not the least of which was being shipwrecked!  The SECRET is this; contentment is found in GOD in not self.

There is good evidence that Paul was well-educated and steeped in the Greek-influenced culture of his time.  It’s likely he’d read what the Greek philosopher Plato wrote about the contented man; “that man should be sufficient unto himself for all things, and able, by the power of his own will, to resist the force of circumstances.”  What Plato misunderstood as an achievement of will, Paul rightly understood as an act of God’s grace.  He wrote, I CAN DO EVERYTHING THROUGH HIM WHO GIVES ME STRENGTH.

God’s strength and His love never fail.  The love and strength of people will ultimately always fail, despite our best intentions.  God never does.  Philippians 4:13 is often taken as a promise of empowerment and it is that, but it is also the basis for our contentment, regardless of whatever we’re experiencing in the moment.  To be content, we must seek to be

DEPENDENT on God,

INTERDEPENT on each other, and

INDEPENDENT of the support of others so we can avoid idleness and support others.

Envy is a sin because it makes an idol of things.  The virtue of Contentment is based on trust in God.

Anyone UNDER 50 needs no introduction to

FB

        Facebook is an online social media and networking company. It was launched on February 4, 2004, by Mark Zuckerberg, along with some fellow Harvard College students, with membership initially limited to Harvard students.

As of January 2018, Facebook has more than 2.2 billion monthly active users. Facebook has become so commonly used that most of the people you know use it.  In fact, some Millennials have abandoned Facebook because it’s gotten so full of “old people!”

We chose Facebook as a symbol of ENVY because, like the cartoon character in this illustration, Facebook becomes a way of looking into the lives of others, a view that can easily degenerate into envy.  However, here’s a disclaimer: just because someone put something on Facebook doesn’t make it true.  No, I’m serious!

In an article on the Independent’s website, Peter Walker cited an experiment by the University of Copenhagen involving 1,095 people, half of whom were asked to continue their Facebook habits and half ordered to abstain from logging on.

The data suggests Facebook causes people to suffer what they called “Facebook envy” and become particularly depressed.  Users taking a week-long break from Facebook were found to be more satisfied with life and gave higher scores to their own well-being.  So “Facebook envy” is not something made up to benefit this message, there is a reasonable connection between Facebook and the vice of ENVY and users suffering the consequences of ENVY.

God’s people are to practice CONTENTMENT instead of being guilty of ENVY.  This leads to our final question:

How do I practice contentment?

One, simplify your life.  Adopt the motto “Less is more.”  Imagine what the object you want to buy sitting neglected and dusty on a shelf or in a closet, as that’s how it will probably end up.  Hum or sing the song “The Bare Necessities” as you shop. Understand the “Inverse Rule of Possessions” – “The more things you own, the more things own you.”

Two, keep your ambition within your means.  This is a financial philosophy: “debt is dumb” as financial guru Dave Ramsey says.  It stresses relationships and creates financial chaos that will take more effort to undo than it did to do.  This is also a philosophy for all of life.  We all have our strengths and weaknesses.  Envy happens when we mistakenly think we ought to have things that are not actually in our power to possess.

Three, put your priorities in order.  Do we need to be reminded that God is to come first, others second, and self last? We may not need a reminder to believe it, but we probably need a reminder to ACT on that principle.  We affirm this truth in the way we act & speak.

It’s a fairly easy thing to say that the Bible is true and that we ought to follow God’s commands as revealed in the Bible.  However, so much more than a nod of one’s head is required.  We must act as if it is true by having our attitudes and actions be determined by what the Lord says.

Take ENVY for example.  Envy is a poison we take hoping the other person will drop dead.  Don’t do it. Replace ENVY and worry and all other forms of materialism with CONTENTMENT and trust in God.

Father Abraham had a Son

(Please read Genesis 22:1-19 in your preferred Bible.  I used the NIV to prepare this study.)

Professional baseball has been played in America since 1875, but on September 14, 1990, something happened that has never happened before or since. Late in his career, Ken Griffey, Sr., who had been a key member of the World Series champion Cincinnati Reds years before, was signed by the Seattle Mariners. His son Ken Griffey, Jr. was just starting his major league career. In the first inning of a game against the Angels, Griffey, Sr. hit a home run to left center field. His son followed him to the plate and hit another home run to almost exactly the same spot. It was the only time a father and son had hit back-to-back home runs in baseball history. Ken Griffey, Jr. said later that his father greeted him at the plate by saying, “That’s how you do it, son!”

There are few joys that can compare to seeing our children and grandchildren succeed. Whether it’s on a ball field, at a music recital, in an academic competition, or, most importantly, in a spiritual setting, seeing a child demonstrate character and competence is a true pleasure. But this victory is not something that just happens. Every right performance, every victory over temptation, every accomplishment is the result of a concerted effort to prepare for the moment of challenge.

As we so often see in the Bible, this moment of high drama is written in an understated way, devoid of lurid details or a psychological exploration of the characters.  It’s easy to imagine Abraham’s feelings by projecting ourselves and our children into the narration, so we can guess at the surprise Abraham felt at the command, the dread he felt during the journey, the resolve he showed atop Mr. Moriah.

We need to remember that these things are not found in the Bible because the emphasis is not on any of the human beings, but on God.  Remind yourself that God is the hero of every historical account.  Though these verses are tense with drama, the point is that we do NOT center our attention on Abraham or Isaac, but upon God and what He is doing in them.

Just as the Bible is God-centered, so is biblical parenting.  One of places the Church and the world have erred is in making children the center of family life.  If we truly desire to have a home life that is at its healthiest and happiest, then we do the hard work of centering our focus on God and keeping Him in the middle of all we do in the home.

The best parenting is God-centered, not child-centered or self-centered.

Self-centered parenting reduces children to pawns we move about to inflate our ego.  The typical example is that of “stage parent” or expectations that children will follow their parents in choices of college and/or vocation.  Parents who are motivated to satisfy themselves through their children are prone to all kinds of abuse.

Though it sounds like a better situation, child-centered parenting is just as far from God’s will as self-centered parenting.  Children have a place in most families but it is never first place.  Children given too many choices, too much authority, and/or too much freedom are bound to be self-centered and godless adults.  A husband & wife constitute a family; children are additions to it.

The biblical standard is God-centered parenting.  It requires the most work and discipline, but provides the most joy and best results as well.

  1. Background: Isaac was the son of promise.

The promise was made in chapter eighteen when three angels came to announce to Abraham and Sarah that after decades of childlessness, they would be blessed with the birth of a son.  Biologically speaking, this was a miracle.

The promise was kept 25 years later, in chapter twenty-one, when Isaac was born.

  1. God gave Abraham a weird command (1-2).

While child sacrifice was common in pagan cultures, it was not Abraham’s practice.  For example, in Carthage, archaeologists have excavated a pagan temple to find remains of thousands of children sacrificed to false gods.

It was often a brutal, unmerciful form of killing:  hollow metal statues were heated by internal fires and then the children set in the red-hot hands of the idol.  Though we are at a time when God has not yet revealed His law forbidding child sacrifice, we can pretty safely assume it was not Abraham’s practice for two reasons: first, he had previously been childless; none to offer as sacrifices.  Second, God chose Abraham because he was a good man and child sacrifice was not the kind of thing good men did.

God knew this command would come at a high cost to Abraham.  We know this from what God said in verse two.

When He said, “YOUR SON, YOUR ONLY SON,” God is clearly not counting Ishmael, an illegitimate son born to Sarah’s maid, Hagar.  That was Sarah and Abraham’s ill-advised attempt to fulfill God’s promise themselves.  It led to bad blood (21:8-21).  It’s idiotic to think of children of “spares;” the loss of any child is great grief. Can we assume then an only child is especially hard to lose as there are no others to love?

God added, “WHOM YOU LOVE.”  How did God know this?  Obviously, God knows all hearts.  In Abraham’s heart He saw love for Isaac.  Because Abraham had waited SO VERY LONG for this son, God knew the idea of losing him must’ve been more difficult.  Add to all of this the fact that Isaac was understood to be the fulfillment of God’s promise.  It is hard to receive a blessing and then have it unexpectedly taken away.

He clarified the means of offering Isaac: “AS A BURNT OFFERING.”  Animal sacrifices were a universal part of cultures of this time, but they had not been made into law by God.  Mercifully, the animal offered was killed first; not left alive to suffer being burned alive.  The Law was still several generations away, awaiting Moses the Lawgiver.  The procedure would have been something familiar to Abraham and Isaac too, as his question later indicates.

The reader is advised in verse one that this whole episode is God “testing” Abraham and we have the benefit of history to know how it turned out.  But Abraham did not know that, so these costs were very real to him and his feelings may’ve been very intense.

God knew Abraham’s heart; we rely on the text to show us that Abraham had deep love for his sons.  One indicator is the way he reacted to Sarah’s demands that Ishmael, the illegitimate son, be sent away: THE MATTER DISTRESSED ABRAHAM GREATLY BECAUSE IT CONCERNED HIS SON (21:11).

God reassured Abraham that it was OK to send them away because his descendants would be enumerated from Isaac.  God also reassured him with the promise that He would make a NATION out of Isaac too.

His distress may’ve been the thing that prompted God to TEST Abraham in this way.  If he reacted so strongly to the loss of Ishmael, how would he react to the loss of the legitimate son, Isaac?

Let’s take a quick break for a geography lesson.  Why go to MORIAH (2)?  The name meant “place of Yahweh’s provision.”  It was so named in verse fourteen.

The word “provide” figures prominently in this passage as it affirms our trust in God TO provide all we need.  When confronted with the surprising command, Abraham must’ve wondered how God would provide descendants if Isaac would not live.  For example, when Isaac asked about the sacrifice, Abraham affirmed his faith that God would provide one (8).

Why on a mountain (2)?  In most ancient cultures, mountains were considered sacred spots.  It was on mountain tops that altars were constructed, sacrifices were made and worship was offered.

Why end up in BEERSHEBA (19)?  The name meant “Well of Seven” or “Well of Oath.”  It was the place where Abraham made a treaty with Philistine leaders to ensure his family could live peacefully in the region (chapter 21).  Having gone to all that trouble, he chose to remain there.  It was “home.”

  1. Abraham prepared to obey (3-10).

EARLY THE NEXT MORNING (3) meant Abraham practiced obedience in time.  He didn’t wait for a convenient time or procrastinate.

God promised to show Abraham the place (2) and he did (4).  This revelation happened ON THE THIRD DAY after they left Beersheba.  We should not miss this detail.  Abraham kept the purpose of the long journey to himself and must’ve agonized inwardly over this long period.  Wow!

When they arrived, Abraham kept the servants at a distance (5), perhaps to prevent their interference.

Isaac was involved but not informed in this sacrificial offering (6-8).  I don’t know his age at this time, but Isaac was old enough to reason and express himself and had clearly been on these sacrificial trips before.

He went through a mental checklist:

Wood?  Check.

Fire?  Check.

The KNIFE (a special sacrificial one)?  Check.

The lamb?  Oops.  No lamb – no check.  Did dad forget the lamb?  Seems kind of important – better ask him about it.

Abraham’s answer to Isaac’s question is a little evasive, but fits the theme perfectly: “God will PROVIDE the lamb, my son.”  Isaac apparently trusted his father, as the text makes clear that there was no more conversation about it (8).

How was Abraham able to do this?  Going by his actions, Abraham’s heart was resolved: his motive was to obey God .  Going by what Paul and James were inspired to write about this event, Abraham’s rationalization was theological: he trusted God to have the power to fix this.

Actions count and Abraham acted in obedience all the way.  He built the altar, piled the wood on it, tied Isaac up, the lifted him up on the wood and drew his knife.  That’s a lot of work to do and there is no sign in the text that he did it with a conflicted heart or mind.  He just obeyed.

  1. God blessed Abraham’s obedience (11-19).

God stayed Abraham’s hand at the last moment, sparing Isaac (11).  Rembrandt’s painting captures this moment brilliantly: the angel intervened to save Isaac.  Hundreds of years later, God would make this occasion part of His Law; in Exodus 13:1+15 he declared that the first-born were all His; a “sacrifice” that did not need to be executed because they were His already.

God explained Himself in vs. 12, 15-18.  This event not only tested Abraham’s faith, but reinforced his conviction that God would use Isaac to bring about the many descendants he promised.  The main point, however, is not about Isaac; it’s about Abraham and his faith.  Because he demonstrated to God that he did not value his son above God, God confirms His promises to Abraham:

He will be blessed (12:2).

His descendants would be innumerable (13:16; 15:5; 17:2).

They will possess the CITIES OF THEIR ENEMIES (12:7; 13:15; 15:18; 17:8).

God would bless the entire world through them (12:3; 18:18).

God provided a substitute sacrifice (13-14).  Though a ram could naturally get caught by its horns in thorns, the fact that it was there exactly when and where it was needed, that is clearly supernatural.

Abraham perceived it this way and named the place to commemorate the event.

Theologically, we’re all in favor of the sovereignty of God until we have to change our plans or until we have to recognize that when God uses someone, it’s not always with their permission or approval.  It’s comforting to know that God is in charge up until the moment we insist on being in charge.

We can’t have it both ways, folks.  Since the Bible teaches us that God does not change and that he is in charge, we all have to face the fact that it is NOT all about me.  While human beings are the pinnacle of His creation, we bend to follow HIS will, not Him to follow ours.

What learned from Samson in the last five weeks is that God’s plan will be completed.  Whether we are pawns or a king, God is the hand that moves us.

In short, we need to build a bridge and get over ourselves.

James uses the account of Abraham offering Isaac as evidence to support his teaching that faith must be paired with works to be real.  We read in James 2:20-24:

You foolish person, do you want evidence that faith without deeds is useless?  Was not our father Abraham considered righteous for what he did when he offered his son Isaac on the altar?  You see that his faith and his actions were working together, and his faith was made complete by what he did.  And the scripture was fulfilled that says, “Abraham believed God, and it was credited to him as righteousness,” and he was called God’s friend.  You see that a person is considered righteous by what they do and not by faith alone.

This quote also gives us a third interpretation of the life of Abraham, how it was faith that motivated his obedience to God.  Even though Abraham could not, in the moment, see how God was going to work things out, he followed through and did everything God commanded.  That is how disciples behave: obedience comes before understanding, if necessary.

Right from the Beginning #7

(Please read Genesis 3:7-24 in your Bible.  I have used the (c) 2011 NIV for these remarks.)

Jesus calls us to be people who live in present-tense.  This is not human nature.  An average person’s anxiety is focused on :
40% — things that will never happen
30% — things about the past that can’t be changed
12% — things about criticism by others, mostly untrue
10% — about health, which gets worse with stress
8% — about real problems that will be faced
Stop trying to grapple with the what ifs¨ and let God take care of it. You simply make that long term investment in God’s kingdom day by day.
While touring Italy, a man visited a cathedral that had been completed on the outside only. Once inside, the traveler found an artist kneeling before an enormous wall upon which he had just begun to create a mosaic. On some tables nearby were thousands of pieces of colored ceramic. Curious, the visitor asked the artist how he would ever finish such a large project. The artist answered that he knew how much he could accomplish in one day. Each morning, he marked off an area to be completed that day and didn’t worry about what remained outside that space. That was the best he could do; and if he faithfully did his best, one day the mosaic would be finished.
<This information was found in Today in the Word, September 5, 1995, p. 32.  It was retrieved from http://www.sermoncentral.com/illustrations/sermon-illustration-paul-fritz-stories-anxiety-guilt-10217.asp on 11/10/16.>

The difference between right and wrong, truth and falsehood is as crucial today as it has ever been.  Consider the devastating consequences of false guilt and untrue anxiety on the human personality.  And there are larger, theological and philosophical issues at stake: we need a macro-narrative in this culture that exalts micro-narratives and is bent on extreme individualism.  Post-modernism may be a fad but people of faith need authoritative answers that set human nature in its most true – most biblical – roots.  To this end we have delved into Genesis 1-3 and complete this series with this seventh installment

  1. What was the people’s offense (3:6)?

They both ate fruit from the forbidden tree.  This verse does not describe the trees, but it does name two of them.

– The Tree of Life.

– The Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil.

On the basis of the information given, I imagine that they were all the same kind of tree.  This would mean that, to Adam and Eve, God’s command seemed arbitrary; there was no visual reason for setting these two trees aside as special.  I believe this detail is implied in the text to reinforce the fact that our understanding of God’s commands is not required, only our obedience.  If we trust God, we obey immediately and fully.

It’s worth noting repeatedly that v. 6 shows Adam had been there all along and did/said nothing.  Though it is a detail easily overlooked, the text makes it plain that Adam was there all along: HER HUSBAND, WHO WAS WITH HER.

Are you surprised or not to note Adam’s contribution in vs. 1-5?  It was nothing.  He said and did nothing during the whole exchange between the WOMAN and the SERPENT.  He did nothing to stop her from taking fruit from the tree and eating it.  Worse, when the situation turned to him, he joined the WOMAN in her disobedience; HE ATE IT.

  1. What were the consequences of their sin (3:7-24)?

Shame (7).  Whereas in chapter two their nakedness had been a sign of their innocence, Adam and the WOMAN’s sudden knowledge of evil turned their nakedness to shame.

FIG LEAVES are the only description of the trees in the account.  Could it be that the garden was populated with fig trees? That is the reason for my earlier imaginative interpretation that there was only one kind of tree in the garden.  Later in the Bible the fig tree is used as a symbol of Israel, the people of God.  What’s important here in verse seven is that they attempted to hide their nakedness with roughly made garments, composed of what was at hand.  They must’ve been desperate for a cover-up.

Fear (8-10).  Hiding becomes a coping mechanism; they attempted to conceal themselves entirely from God.  Maybe they thought their leaf wardrobe would be like “camo” and help them blend into the trees.  Notice how the writer sets the scene of shame and a frantic cover-up in contrast to the idyllic paradise: when God arrived on the scene, He walked IN THE COOL OF THE DAY.  God called out to our parents; not because He didn’t know their location, or what they had done (He appeared immediately after their sin), but to call to them personally, in a loving, non-confrontative way.

Adam offered a lame explanation and in the process exposes his moral failure: “I WAS AFRAID BECAUSE I WAS NAKED.”  Of what was Adam AFRAID?

– Embarrassment?  It’s possible.  I know I would not be comfortable standing before God with only a salad around my hips.

– Wrath?  Adam had never known wrath – it had never been necessary before.  So, unless this came with the KNOWLEDGE gained from the fruit, I can’t see a fear of wrath motivating him.

– Most likely, death.  In 2:17 God had warned Adam that he would die if he ate the fruit of the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil.  Surely that was on Adam’s mind as he tried to hide from God.

Division in relationships (11-13).  God confronted Adam with the truth. Again, “WHO TOLD YOU THAT YOU WERE NAKED?” is not a question asked for information’s sake, but to draw Adam out and allow him to be responsible for his mistake and ask God’s forgiveness.  Likewise the third and fourth rhetorical questions God asked.  If we understand God’s three questions as being opportunities for Adam to repent, he failed miserably.  Sin had already driven a wedge between him and God, so when he blamed the WOMAN, he not only failed to repent, but opened the world’s first experiment in “the blame game.” So instead of fixing his relationship with God, he makes matters worse by offending his wife as well!

The WOMAN followed Adam’s lead, and blamed the SERPENT.  Comically, the SERPENT has no one left to blame and soon it will have no fingers with which to point!  This leads to rhetorical question #4; “WHAT IS THIS YOU HAVE DONE?”  (The same question God posed to the first murderer, Cain, in 4:9-10.)

Curses (14-19).  By being at the end of the line, the SERPENT lost the Blame Game and is cursed first; it is cursed to groveling & enmity (14-15).  In part 6 we theorized that the SERPENT was an animal unlike any of the other animals of creation, given powers of speech and reason but not the IMAGE OF GOD.  The divine curse also sets it apart from all the other animals created on Day Six.

Groveling.  Micah 7:17 depicts God’s wrath on pagan nations as causing them to “lick the dust like a serpent, like the crawling things of the earth.”  In the Bible, this is a way of describing total defeat.  Crawling and eating dust will be the way of life for the SERPENT for the remainder of its life.

ENMITY means that all the OFFSPRING of the SERPENT and the WOMAN will forever hate one another.  Some people have seen the last part of verse fifteen as a prophecy, predicting that Jesus would gain the final victory over Satan.

The curses on the WOMAN included painful childbirth and masculine authority (16).  Being fruitful and multiplying will come at a high cost for the WOMAN from that moment on.  God says this twice, so we know it’s important.  “YOUR DESIRE WILL BE FOR YOUR HUSBAND AND HE WILL RULE OVER YOU” is clearly not a description of God’s plan for husband-wife relations, it is a curse.

Some object that this statement is putting words in God’s mouth, trying to justify the paternalistic culture of the Bible writers.  That’s just nonsense.  God is exercising His wrath on the WOMAN for her role in this whole awful affair, not rewarding the man.  As the text makes very plain (2:24), God created the marriage relationship to be a special blessing, the two becoming ONE FLESH.  Now sin has entered the picture and marriage becomes a tug of war, a struggle for dominance with the WOMAN the loser.

The curses on ADAM were toilsome labor & death (17-19).  We’ve observed that God intended from the beginning that His people should work (2:15).   While it is a four-letter word, work itself is NOT a curse.  Instead, God’s wrath on ADAM was to make his work frustrating – it will become toilsome – hard labor and sometimes unfruitful.

More importantly, death enters the picture: “FOR DUST YOU ARE AND TO DUST YOU SHALL RETURN.”  As we’ve seen, Adam will not immediately die, but as long as he had access to the TREE OF LIFE, he would have lived indefinitely.

Male authoritarianism is revisited in v. 20 as Adam named Eve.  This is the first of the curses we see coming to pass.  Up to this point, she was simply called THE WOMAN (2:23); she had no personal name.  But in v. 20 Adam named her; this is the first exercise of the male authority God warned the WOMAN would be her due for disobedience.  The act of naming the WOMAN eve is an extension of what we saw in 2:19-20; God delegated part of His authority to ADAM when He tasked the man with naming the animals.  He is exercising the same authority here in 3:20.

A change in the function of animals: they became a resource for human beings (21).  Since FIG LEAVES do not make a very good garment, God took the skins of animals to make our parents a nice set of leather clothes.  Fancy. Formerly, animals existed for their own sake; now they exist to sustain people.  This act would draw an obligatory protest from PETA (had it been in existence) but nicety gives way to necessity.

Going back to death again, God explained in v. 22 two reasons for exiling our parents from paradise.  They now had knowledge of evil and were forever changed by it.  They could not be allowed to be LIKE God in that way and remain in the Garden.

The man was cursed with death.  If he were allowed to remain in the Garden he could continue to eat from the TREE OF LIFE and thereby avoid death.  This is NOT saying that our parents were created to be immortal and lost it – just the opposite – they were created mortal and needed access to the TREE OF LIFE to be immortal.  And so we read in Proverbs 14:12 & 16:25, THERE IS A WAY WHICH SEEMS RIGHT TO A MAN, BUT ITS END IS DEATH.  No doubt many tombstones could be marked with an epitaph that reads, “It seemed like a good idea at the time.”  Like Adam and Eve, we were tempted by the appeal of sin, but failed to weigh its consequences and suffered them just the same.

A final consequence is loss in relationship with God; in this case taking the form of banishment from the garden (23-24).  V. 23 indicates that Adam would immediately begin the toilsome work God indicated in the curse: TO WORK THE GROUND FROM WHICH HE HAD BEEN TAKEN.  What irony!  The very stuff from which his life had been made would now frustrate and exhaust ADAM!

In case they had any notions of sneaking back in, God put them to rest by stationing angelic guards at the entrance to the Garden, armed with a FLAMING SWORD!  What they had lost because of sin, Adam and Eve would never regain.  This put them at a physical distance from God; there would be no more walks IN THE COOL OF THE DAY (8).

  1. What the New Testament has to say about the Fall.

– Regarding Adam = Adam’s sin brought death to the human race.  (See Romans 5 and 1 Corinthians 15.)

– Regarding Eve = Eve’s daughters are subject to Adam’s sons.  (See the Apostle Paul’s use of Genesis to support gender roles in the First Century Church in 1 Corinthians 11:7-12, 2 Corinthians 11:3, 1 Timothy 2:11-15.  These passages present a challenge for moderns.  Working out a biblical and useful interpretation takes courage, wisdom, and a commitment to dialogue.)

One mom was out walking with her 4-year-old daughter when her girl picked up something from the ground and started to put it in her mouth. The mother tells what happens in her own words:
“I took the item away from her and I asked her not to do that.” My daughter quickly asked, “Why?” “Because it’s been lying outside, you don’t know where it’s been, it’s dirty and probably has germs,” I replied.
At this point, my daughter looked at me with total admiration and asked, “Wow! How do you know all this stuff?”
I thought quickly and said, “All moms know this stuff. It’s on the Mommy Test. You have to know it, or they don’t let you be a Mommy.”
We walked along in silence for 2 or 3 minutes, as she pondered this new information. “Oh…I get it!” she beamed, “So if you don’t pass the test you have to be the daddy?”
I smiled and replied, “Exactly.”
<From a sermon by Mark Opperman, Mothers: Guardians of the Heart, 6/19/2012, retrieved from http://www.sermoncentral.com/illustrations/sermon-illustration-sermon-central-staff-humor-mothersday-82154.asp on 11/10/16.>

You see how misinformation gets started?  But seriously, it has been our objective throughout these series of messages to correct misunderstandings and get Genesis right from the beginning.

With that goal in view: in case we missed it in 2:4, let’s review and reassert the point of view of the author of Genesis: THIS IS THE ACCOUNT OF THE HEAVENS AND THE EARTH WHEN THEY WERE CREATED, WHEN THE LORD GOD MADE THE EARTH AND THE HEAVENS.  He is writing with the purpose of accounting for, or explaining how what is came into being.  There is nothing in his mind about symbolism or allegory or other such stuff and nonsense as modern writers apply to Genesis.  Moses wrote history.  He wrote it as it had been revealed to him by the Holy Spirit.

That is another reason we have approached our study of Genesis as a study of facts, not symbols.  We have seen time and again that when we don’t let scientific arrogance or modernism get in the way that the facts do speak for themselves.  They present a coherent and consistent development of the origins of the human race and the world in which we live.

Right from the Beginning #6

(Please read Genesis 3:1-6 in your Bible. I have used the NIV to prepare these remarks.)

We spent last month observing all the wonderful aspects of creation.  God made a home and then He made people to live in it.  Our parents, Adam and Eve, lived in paradise.

We don’t have any notion of the amount of time that passed between Genesis 2 and 3.  We don’t know how long our parents enjoyed their home.  But it clearly did not last.  How did we get from the creation God Himself said was GOOD to the world as we know it?

The first part of that answer is given in Genesis 3.  In what theologians call “The Fall from Grace” or simply “The Fall,” all creation goes from blessed to cursed.  Because of the sin of the first family, creation is compromised; humanity is banished from its home and worst of all, loses its close relationship with its Creator.

This Fall is staggering; hard to imagine.  What’s worse, it happened so easily, so swiftly.  The Fall is no great drama of struggle, only the disgusting and discouraging account of how our folks literally ate us out of house and home.  They exchanged the truth of God for a lie (RMS 1:25) and found out too late the terrible cost of the bargain they struck.  It was too easy.

In fact, I would say that the account of the Fall is a tale very suited for our modern age.  At the center of Genesis 3 is a search for knowledge.  The SERPENT enticed the WOMAN with the possibility that she could gain knowledge without learning or experience.  Further, that such knowledge would make her “LIKE GOD.”

The search for knowledge apart from God is one of the driving motivations of secular society in our time.  In the last three centuries science has been hijacked and misused to be the means of seeking knowledge apart from knowing God.

We hardly pause to consider whether the knowledge we find is for good or evil, whether it helps or hurts or both; we plunge ahead greedily, unencumbered by a moral point of view that we inherit from our Creator.

In the process, our knowledge has created as many problems as it has solved.  What has not changed is human nature and our tendency to misuse what we know to our own self-destruction.  Consider: we learn the secret of how to release energy from the atom and what’s the first thing we do with it?  Weaponize it. Wage war with it.

It’s clear that the story of the Fall is our personal story, it is our racial character writ small in the lives of the first family.  Let us begin our study of the Fall by owning it.  Let us learn the terrible price of sin so we will not repeat our parents’ mistake.

  1. Who/what is THE SERPENT?

The author of Genesis does not characterize or describe the MAN or WOMAN in any way other than NAKED, but he has some things to tell us about the SERPENT.  For that reason alone we should pay attention to what we learn from Genesis about the SERPENT.

It was MORE CRAFTY than the other WILD ANIMALS.  We’ll take a look at the two salient points of this description.

First, MORE CRAFTY.  The word CRAFTY can also be translated as “shrewd.”  This is an ambiguous word.  Depending on the end to which it is used, it can be a virtue or a vice.  Proverbs 12:16 & 13:16 say it is a quality wise people will cultivate, and in MTW 10:16 Jesus urged His disciples to be AS WISE AS SERPENTS, BUT AS HARMLESS AS DOVES.  When it is harnessed to do evil, shrewdness can also be a vice (Exodus 21:14; Joshua 9:4; Job 5:12; 15:5).  It is so shrewd it not only knew how to speak, but it knew how to manipulate Eve with its words.  In the Hebrew language this is a play on words: “Eve thought the fruit would make her shrewd, but she found out she was nude.”

Second, WILD ANIMALS.  We learned in 1:24 the phrase WILD ANIMALS was one of the three kinds of land animals, the group of predators.  So the SERPENT was shrewder than all the other predatory animals.  But in 3:14, God cursed the SERPENT ABOVE ALL LIVESTOCK & ALL WILD ANIMALS (including both prey animals and predatory animals), so it was also the most cursed.          Elsewhere in the Bible we learn Eve was deceived by the serpent’s CUNNING (2 Corinthians 11:3).  Revelation 12:9 refers to Satan as THAT ANCIENT SERPENT, one example of other verses where a serpent is a metaphor for Satan.

Is this a literal serpent or a symbol?  On the “symbol side,” the fact that an animal is speaking is a detail some use as evidence that the SERPENT of Genesis 3 is symbolic.  The Bible uses the SERPENT as a symbol of evil, an enemy of life, & a force of chaos (see Isaiah 30:6).  Serpents are also a biblical symbol of craftiness.  Psalm 58:4-5 goes so far as to say that a cobra may outwit the snake charmer.

God declared serpents to be “unclean” animals; not suitable as food or as a sacrifice.  More than that, they became a symbol of the MOST unclean animal; something at the bad end of creation.

However, on the literal side, in Genesis 3, the SERPENT is not identified as Satan.  The text in question should be our primary source of information to answer the question of literal intent.

Can we put all this information together to form a theory that makes sense?  Yes.  Since we have no good reason to take GNS 3 as being anything other than literally, historically true, we begin by saying that an actual animal was involved.  This animal is unlike the snakes of our own time in that it had the powers of speech and thought but did not bear the IMAGE OF GOD.  It’s horrifying to imagine a thinking, strategizing, shrewd predator, but relax: it no longer exists.  And since the rest of the Bible attributes this work of deception to Satan and calls him a SERPENT, we can assume Satan possessed the form of this extinct animal.

This begs the question, why would God create such an animal?   For the simple fact that if people really have free will, then they have an actual choice to make.  Had God put our parents in the Garden where there were no other voices, no temptations, then they did not truly have a choice, did they?

  1. What was THE SERPENT’s deception (3:1-6)?

Tactic #1 = It went to THE WOMAN as Gods commands were given to ADAM.  The command was given in 2:16-17, the WOMAN was created in 2:21-22.  This implies that the WOMAN knew the command only second-hand; Adam told her about it.  The WOMAN’s replies to the SERPENT are not precisely correct; this may indicate she didn’t fully understand the commandment.  It makes sense in a crafty way to approach the person who got the command secondhand.  They will usually know less and feel less strongly about it.

Tactic #2 = It questioned the commandment to cause diversion.  In verse one, the SERPENT deliberately misquoted God.  This is a tactic to couch the commandment in its own terms, diverting the WOMAN from the truth.  It is phrased as a question in a typically passive-aggressive way of misleading people as questions don’t usually excite opposition as much as statements.  The SERPENT was being indirect.  The diversion worked, because the WOMAN misquoted God; He did NOT prohibit touching the TREE, only eating the fruit of the tree.

Notice how this slanders God, diminishing His generosity.  God gave them access to all the other trees in the garden, but the SERPENT’s question diverted the WOMAN’s attention away from those and focused on the one forbidden tree and made God seem stingy to forbid them that one.

Tactic #3 = It contradicted the commandment; caused doubt.  In verses four and five, the SERPENT takes a more direct approach, using half-truths to deceive.

The first half-truth was the definition of death. God did warn they WOULD CERTAINLY DIE, but He did not say it would be a physical death or that it would be immediate death.  The SERPENT was half-right to say they would NOT DIE, for they did not die immediately.  As a matter of biblical record, Adam lived to be 930 (see Genesis 5:5)!

The second half-truth was the SERPENT’s promise to the WOMAN that her eyes would be OPENED.  In verse seven the text says that both their eyes were opened, but what they saw wasn’t god-like or even good; they saw they were NAKED and knew shame for the first time.

The third half-truth was the SERPENT’s promise they would be like God.  That did happen, but it was not a good thing.  In v. 22, God explained that the first family had to be banished from the GARDEN because they had NOW BECOME LIKE ONE OF US, KNOWING GOOD AND EVIL.  The irony is that they were already “like God” in the sense that they were endowed with the IMAGE OF GOD.

The fourth half-truth was the SERPENT’s promise that the fruit held knowledge.  How symptomatic it is of human nature to hunger for knowledge without having to work for it or consider the consequences of what we learn.  The problem here is what they learned.  Before they disobeyed God, Adam and the WOMAN knew only good, by disobeying, they knew both good and evil, but that knowledge was about the only thing they shared with God.

These are examples the misuse of shrewdness to twist words to imply a meaning they were not intended to convey.  One more thing: notice the SERPENT never directly tells them to eat the fruit, nor even implies it.  It directs attention away from the command of God to the fruit itself.  This is a way temptation often works; indirectly and subtly.

Tactic #4 = It made the fruit out to be more than it was.  Note that two of the three things the WOMAN saw in the fruit were already stated in 2:9 about ALL THE TREES.  Everything God offered them was GOOD FOR FOOD and PLEASING TO THE EYE!  She added the bit about DESIRABLE FOR WISDOM under the influence of the SERPENT’s crafty lies and manipulation.

The phrase GOOD FOR FOOD sounds like a rationalization.  This is the tendency of human/sin nature to make excuses.  For the WOMAN to say it was PLEASING TO THE EYE is an example of materialism.  This is the tendency of human/sin nature to think selfishly and short-term.  The part the woman added, DESIRABLE FOR WISDOM is a falsehood.  This is the tendency of human/sin nature to prefer comfortable lies to discomforting truths.

Even though the Fall is no laughing matter, our first parents have rightly been the object of many jokes.  Here are a few a preacher can share in church:

How did Adam and Eve feel when expelled from the Garden of Eden?

They were definitely put out.

What is one of the first things Adam and Eve did after they were kicked out?  They raised a little Cain.

It has been said that Adam and Eve had the perfect marriage. That was because he didn’t have to hear about all the men she could have married;

and she didn’t have to hear about the way his mother cooked!

A Brit, a Frenchman and a Russian are in a museum viewing a painting of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden.

“Look at their reserve, their calm,” muses the Brit. “They must be British.”

“Nonsense,” the Frenchman disagrees.   “They’re naked, and so beautiful.  Clearly, they are French.”

“No clothes, no shelter,” the Russian points out, “they have only an apple to eat, and they’re being told this is paradise. They are certainly

Russian.”

Adam and Eve had their first fight and Adam got the last word for the last time.  He said, “I’ll wear the plants in this family!”

<Let the user beware: not all the jokes at this website are as clean as these.  Retrieved from http://www.yuksrus.com/religion_adam_and_eve.html on 11/4/16.>

What can be said about our two parents?  They literally had it all, but after two deceptive comments from a SERPENT under the influence of Satan, they chucked it all away!  They were deceived, but chose of their own free will to be “like” God rather than love God.

Would any of us have done any better?  Is it possible the account of the Fall is more personally applicable than we’d feel comfortable admitting?

Here at the end of an election cycle, the application of what we’ve learned today should be obvious and relevant: don’t believe everything you hear.  Instead, do as the Bible commands and compare all claims of truth to the Word of God.  Do not be deceived by the enemy’s lies and do not surrender any of God’s gifts to temptation.

(To see the video version of this message, please look up “EBCSF” on YouTube.)

Right from the Beginning – #5

(Please read Genesis 2:1-3 in your Bible.  I have used the NIV to prepare these remarks.)

Lewis Sperry Chafer, in his book Grace, told the following story:
“One man challenged another to an all-day wood chopping contest. The challenger worked very hard, stopping only for a brief lunch break. The other man had a leisurely lunch and took several breaks during the day. At the end of the day, the challenger was surprised and annoyed to find that the other fellow had chopped substantially more wood than he had.

“’I don’t get it,’ he said. ‘Every time I checked, you were taking a rest, yet you chopped more wood than I did.’

“‘But you didn’t notice,’ said the winning woodsman, ‘that I was sharpening my ax when I sat down to rest.’”

<Retrieved from http://www.sermonsearch.com/sermon-illustrations/5615/i-was-sharpening-my-ax/ on 10/27/16.>

This little parable tells us that constant activity is not a guarantee of success.  Workaholism is no more noble an addiction than any other addicted behavior.  To be faithful and successful, periods of work must be alternated with periods of rest.

In our study of Genesis, we have arrived at the final day of creation, a day when God did no more creating.  It is so significant that the creation account ends in this way and yet it is probably the most under-utilized passage of Scripture in the Church.  God set for us an example we are to follow by taking a day of rest following His six days of work.

In Jesus’ time, God’s people went to crazy extremes of legalism about keeping the Sabbath.  There were hundreds of interpretations of what it meant to cease from work.  In our time, God’s people have pretty much gone to the opposite extreme, where keeping a Sabbath is something virtually ignored.  We think that keeping the Sabbath is accomplished by spending an hour or so in church once a week.  In the process of cheating God, we’ve cheated ourselves out of the blessing of knowing what a Sabbath is and how to observe it in a way that pleases God.

For a year now, I’ve had an “infographic” on my desk that shows religious observation in the United States.  The data was assembled by the Gallup organization and has limited usefulness, but offers a snapshot of the religious life of our nation.

The data shows the total WEEKLY attendance of a church, synagogue, or mosque in 2014.  The state with the highest attendance was Mississippi, which notched 47%.  The state with the lowest attendance was Vermont, with just 17%.  South Dakota is smack in the middle of those extremes at 31%.  Just one third of peoples of faith honor the Sabbath on a weekly basis.  Never mind which faiths or which day of the week, lump them all together and that’s the best we can come up with.

Did God intend His people should take the Sabbath seriously?  The answer is yes.  In Exodus 20, it is the fourth of the Ten Commandments and easily the lengthiest Commandment.  In Exodus 31:14 the LORD said, “OBSERVE THE SABBATH, BECAUSE IT IS HOLY TO YOU.  ANYONE WHO DESECRATES IT IS TO BE PUT TO DEATH; THOSE WHO DO ANY WORK ON THAT DAY MUST BE CUT OFF FROM THEIR PEOPLE.”  Sabbath violators were to receive the death penalty.  I’d say it doesn’t get any more serious than that!

While we as Christians are not bound to the Law of Moses in the same way as our Jewish forebears were, the command to observe the Sabbath remains.  We are not free in Christ to ignore the Sabbath, but we are free to observe it in ways that are appropriate to us individually.

REVIEW

  1. Before creation: Only God existed (1:1-2).
  2. Creation, Day One: Separating day and night (1:3-5).
  3. Day Two: Separating sky and sea (1:6-8).
  4. Day Three: Separating the sea and the land; growing plants on the land (1:9-13).
  1. Day Four: Creating heavenly lights (1:14-19).
  2. Day Five: Creating animals for the sea & sky (1:20-23).

NEW

  1. Day Seven: Instituting the Sabbath (2:1-3).

GOD HAD FINISHED THE WORK HE HAD BEEN DOING (1).  God declared His creation VERY GOOD (1:31).  Part of what that means is that it was complete.  It was finished.  One of His purposes in instituting the Sabbath was to give His people a weekly reminder that we are creation, He is our Creator.  He is worthy of our worship and devotion.  The Hebrew word for WORK here occurs three times in this passage and is the usual word for our ordinary operations.  It’s ironic that such an ordinary word is used to sum up the supernatural work of creation, but creation is what God does.

ON THE SEVENTH DAY HE RESTED FROM ALL HIS WORK (2). The Hebrew word sabbat (“rest”) is qualified by the phrase FROM HIS WORK.  It means that He ceased the creative labors.  God stopped doing what He had been doing.

We noted last week that one of the eight things about the creation of humans was that He created us to work.  On the 7th day we learn He also created us to rest.  REST involves several things:

– Ceasing from our usual labor.

– Being inactive long enough to restore health; getting enough sleep.

– Restoring balance to our lives.  We are not just workers and this world is not our home.  We need to be reminded of our true selves and rightly ordered priorities.

– Finding a place of safety.  We make take adequate food and shelter for granted, but not all people do; observing a Sabbath reminds us to be thankful.

– Sabbath activity must serve only sacred purposes.  We have six days to live in the world; we need one to cleanse ourselves of the world’s influence and reset.

– Get back to nature: pay attention to creation, and, by association, our Creator.

THEN GOD BLESSED THE SEVENTH DAY (3).  In 1:31 God declared creation was VERY GOOD.  Of all the days of creation, this is the only one God BLESSED.  This makes it special and worthy of note.

AND MADE IT HOLY (3).  HOLY in this case means set apart to be used for divine purposes only.  Of all the days of creation, this is the only one God MADE HOLY.  That also makes it worthy of note.

BECAUSE ON IT HE RESTED FROM ALL THE WORK OF CREATING THAT HE HAD DONE (3).  One of the things we did not talk about related to the IMAGE OF GOD is assumed in this passage: one way we function as the IMAGE OF GOD is by following His example.  In this case, Sabbath-keeping is one of the ways we follow God’s example.

Half of observing the Sabbath is ceasing from doing all the other stuff that is part of our typical work week.  Here’s what God said on the subject: “FOR SIX DAYS WORK IS TO BE DONE, BUT THE SEVENTH DAY IS A DAY OF SABBATH REST, HOLY TO THE LORD.  WHOEVER DOES ANY WORK ON THE SABBATH DAY IS TO BE PUT TO DEATH.” (EXODUS 31:15).

Our Sabbath observance is taking time away from our regular stuff in order to repurpose it as a gift to God.  We cease our usual labors in order free up time.  We spend part of that time resting, more of it in righteous activity.

Our observance of a weekly Sabbath is for Rest and Righteousness.  (The BEST kind of “R&R.”)

As God RESTED, we are to devote a day to rest. This means to CEASE from the labors that occupy us during the rest 0f the week.  In every way you care to mention, we need at least a day a week to get away from all the stresses and labors that are typical to our lives on the six non-Sabbath days.  Part of the wisdom of observing a Sabbath are the benefits we derive from it.

As God declared the day to be HOLY, we are to devote a day to righteousness. Righteousness is, in part, activity that draws us closer to God, to one another, and to a better understanding of ourselves.

Righteous activity is NOT the worldly entertainments and occupations we practice the other six days of the week.  We observe a Sabbath by ceasing what usually holds our attention to give it to God instead.

I’ve had to limit my remarks to this one passage and not the subject of the Sabbath because there is a lot of biblical material on the subject and a mountain of interpretation, Jewish, Christian, and Islamic, on what it means to keep the Sabbath.  This message serves to only begin a conversation by scratching the surface. Let’s review what we take away from this text alone.  Here are the “talking points.”

– Our practice of observing the Sabbath is based on the historical fact that God Himself rested one day out of seven.

– Of all the days of creation, God deemed the seventh most important because He BLESSED the day and decreed it to be HOLY.

– Observing the Sabbath requires we plan to REST and engage in RIGHTEOUS activity only.  To REST means ceasing from our usual labors.  To be RIGHTEOUS we replace time usually spent on our labors with time spent on ways that draw us closer to God, closer to His people, and into a more godly view of ourselves.

The experiences and teaching of the New Testament persons, especially Jesus, is that making Sabbath-observance a law just doesn’t work.  In the same way you can’t force anyone to love, you can’t force anyone to keep the Sabbath.  If it’s not there in your heart to begin with, it won’t be genuine.  If it’s not genuine, it’s not worth doing.

On the other hand, we need structure.  We need a place to start thinking about how we can really set aside an entire day for only two things: Rest and Righteousness.  While the following will sound legalistic, it’s not: it’s only a suggestion.  Our human nature is such that we need to make a rule and follow it until we do it because we love it.

STEP ONE: DEFINE YOUR SABBATH DAY

– You must set apart a definite period of time, not just “Sunday.”  Be sensitive to job and family demands.  Make it a time you can keep every week.  Make it 17-24 hours long.

– Some suggestions:

Sundown Saturday to Sundown Sunday.

Midnight Saturday to midnight Sunday.

Noon Saturday to noon Sunday.

– Specify, notify the people around you, especially your family, and ask them to help you stick to it.

STEP TWO: PLAN YOUR SABBATH DAY

– “Failure to plan is planning to fail.”  That’s human nature. Make an hourly plan of how you’ll spend your Sabbath.

– Your plan must include only activities that meet 2 criteria.

The activities must be restful or righteous; they must not be worldly or secular activities.  Let me elaborate on those criteria.

As God RESTED, we are to devote a day to rest.  This means to CEASE from the labors that occupy us during the rest 0f the week.  Suggestions: in your plan, include times to sleep.  Plan to get a good night’s rest AND take a nap.  We’re planning activity and INactivity!  Rest is more than sleep; it’s a refraining from physical activity in order to do mental/ emotional/

spiritual activity.  So, prayer, Bible study, reading and meditation are all appropriate as restful activities, especially in connection with sleep.

As God declared the day to be HOLY, we are to devote a day to righteousness.  Here we are planning the more active hours of our Sabbath.  If you are going to do manual labor, make sure it isn’t the kind you do through the week and that you are praying or serving others while you do it.  The Bible says that we are to work the other six days.  Part of our planning is to get our work done before our Sabbath so we’re not distracted by leftover work.

The primary kind of righteous activity draws us closer to God.  This would include worship, stewardship, prayer, Bible study, fasting.  The secondary kind of righteous activity draws us closer to one another.  This includes worship, fellowship, service, discipleship, witness; things that center on meaningful conversation and relationship-building.  Face-to-face encounters are to be preferred, but anything that facilitates conversation is great.  Give church and family priority.  The tertiary kind of righteous activity helps us understand ourselves and our place in creation.  This includes solitude, private prayer, exercise, journaling, Bible study, hobbies, reading, and meditation.

Refraining from all worldly entertainments and activities is one of the simplest ways to be righteous on the Sabbath.

STEP THREE: KEEP YOUR SABBATH DAY

Start with prayer, end with prayer.  Keep a record of your plan, how you did, and what you did.  Give yourself plenty of grace, but learn from your mistakes.

(If you would like to see and hear this message preached, look us up on YouTube at EBCSF.)

 

 

 

Right from the Beginning – #4

Please read Genesis 1:24-2:25 in your Bible.  I used the NIV to prepare these remarks.

“Taxonomy” is the science of classifying plants and animals into various groupings.  If I were to ask you which animal you think of that defies scientific classification, what might you say?  Would you mention the duckbill platypus as an example?

The point simply is this; science has its own challenges.  There are plants and animals that overlap different categories and/or have exceptional features; classifying them can be difficult.

In studying Genesis one and two, we face a similar problem.  If we study the creation account with the intent of systematizing it, we are going to be thwarted by details that overreach our system or do not fit it precisely.

And yet, we – by faith – understand that there is a unity present, a coherent system of thought with a message God has intended for us to receive.  So we start with the fewest preconceptions possible and do the careful work of allowing the text to have its own voice first.   After we have heard Genesis as it original listeners (and readers) received it, then we adapt our preconceptions to fit what we have learned.

For example, we retain the preconception that God created.  It is, after all, a central tenet of our faith.  What we pitch is that the Bible and science have to agree.  We set aside the notion that “Creationism” must be proven (with all the politico-social baggage accumulated by that movement) and learn what we can from the text about God’s creation of the world.  We accept that the “How?” question will never be as important as the “Who?” question, and less important than the “Why?” question.

REVIEW

  1. Before creation: Only God existed (1:1-2).
  2. Creation, Day One: Separating day and night (1:3-5).
  3. Day Two: Separating sky and sea (1:6-8).
  4. Day Three: Separating the sea and the land; growing plants on the land (1:9-13).
  5. Day Four: Creating heavenly lights (1:14-19).
  6. Day Five: Creating animals for the sea & sky (1:20-23).

NEW

  1. Creation, Day Six: Creating life on the land (1:24-2:25).

First, creating animal life on the land (1:24-25).  Verse 24 reads; LET THE LAND PRODUCE LIVING CREATURES, just as it said that THE LAND produced plant life in v. 15.  That sentence made a lot more sense in verse fifteen as we all know plants grow out of the ground (generally speaking), but we’ve never planted a dog and had puppies grow in the spot.  But – look ahead – what did God use as raw material for the man?  Dirt.  Also, as science informs us, animal bodies are, chemically, minerals and water.  As we noted previously, the term LIVING CREATURES includes all animal life, whether its habitat is land, air, or water.

ACCORDING TO THEIR KINDS (24+25) develops this thought a bit.  As is usual in this passage, these three divisions of animal kind is a functional one.

– LIVESTOCK = domesticated animals.

– CREATURES THAT MOVE ALONG THE GROUND = undomesticated animals that are prey.

– WILD ANIMALS = undomesticated animals that are predators.

Second, we come to the real focus of the creation narrative: creating human life on the land (1:26-2:25).  The text relates eight important truths about the human race.

#1 = We were created in God’s image (1:26).  The Heb word for IMAGE was defined as a physical representation of something that had no physical form. This was contrary to idol-worshippers who believed superstitiously that their idols not only represented the physical form of their gods, but also contained some of their spiritual essence.

As with the rest of the Genesis account, the emphasis is on function; the function of the IMAGE is for us to represent God in creation.  God is a spirit and wants to be present in creation in a physical way, a way tangible to the five senses He gave us.  So, being created in the IMAGE OF GOD means that you and I were created to represent God in our bodies.  We are to reproduce, in daily life, the character and nature of God.

Theologians have haggled over the exact meaning of this word.  (For example, In Genesis 5:3, Adam’s son Seth is described as the IMAGE and LIKENESS of his father.  Since this is said about Seth at birth, this must refer to a physical resemblance; any similarity of character or personality would not be known for several years.  Does this assert that the IMAGE is a physical resemblance?)  I believe it’s not necessary to be specific or precise in or definition of this term any qualities that human beings possess but the rest of creation does not may be considered part of the IMAGE OF GOD.

The IMAGE is God’s intention that human beings be the part of creation that represents the Creator.  Isn’t that enough of a responsibility?  Paul linked the IMAGE with the “new self,” the life of a believer, and saw it as our responsibility to make God known.

– Epehsians 4:24 = …put on the new self, created to be like God in true righteousness and holiness.

– Colossians 3:10 = …put on the new self, which is being renewed in knowledge in the image of its Creator.

#2 = We were created to exercise dominion over creation (1:26, 28-30).  This is a delegated authority.  We do not, by virtue of being human, have any “rights” that make us rulers of creation.  Like everything else, this is a gift from God.  Though it has been misused by some people, being given RULE over creation is not an excuse for mismanaging it.  Instead, it puts us in a managerial position, responsible for taking g0od care of the environment.

The blessing “BE FRUITFUL AND MULTIPLY” is pronounced on all LIVING CREATURES, not just the human race.  God blessed all the creatures he put on Earth; His plan was for the prosperity of all creation.

#3 = We were created from dust (2:7) and from a rib (2:18, 21-2).

The man was created from DUST.  This Hebrew word refers to dry dirt; the loose, granular stuff you and I would call “topsoil.”  It may seem contradictory that something given the honor of bearing God’s IMAGE should come from such humble beginnings: mere dirt.  I should think that’s exactly the point.

However, this “earthen vessel” was not alive in that instant.  The text tells us that the man became alive as God put His BREATH OF LIFE into it.  This phrase always refers to the breathing that all living people do, implying what God did with Adam is not just a one-time event, but is how God bestows life to all of us.

The woman was created out of Adam’s rib.  The Hebrew word for RIB is not anatomically precise.  It can refer to a single rib, the entire rib cage, or a hunk of flesh and bone from the upper torso.  Fortunately, we don’t need it to be precise because we’re not writing a book of anatomy.  The point is that part of the man’s body was used to fashion the woman.  As we will see, the stress is on their similarity, not their difference.

#4 = We were created to live in paradise (2:4-6, 10-14).  The word translated as GARDEN is used to refer to a paradise.  In our culture, the word “park” would be a more accurate translation; it is a place set aside for trees and other landscaping to create a peaceful nature refuge. The most prominent feature of any park is the trees and this one has two tree identified as being special.  We’ll talk about them next month.

In the ancient world, kings spared no expense in creating these kinds of spaces.  In fact, the Hanging Gardens of Babylon were one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

The name EDEN is more than a point of geography; it means “abundant” and modifies the word GARDEN in the sense of “a garden of abundance.” The fact that the GARDEN is well-watered by four rivers that flowed out of EDEN is the explanation of its abundance.  What we’re to learn here is God put the man in an ideal place; of all the places on the surface of the earth, this was the best habitat possible.

#5 = We were created to work (2:15, 19-20).  Adam was not to just live in the GARDEN, he was to work in it.  He is God’s partner in nurturing the life of the GARDEN, both plants and animals.  This is evidence that it has always been God’s plan that work is central to human life.  God didn’t simply provide for the man; Adam was active, working to grow and collect his own food.  God commissioned Adam to name the animals.  This served several purposes, one of which is to show that not all work is manual labor.  God created us to do mental and manual work.

The Hebrew word for WORK is most often used in connection with labor done in service to God; in fact, some commentators would rather see this word translated as “worship.”  We need to remember that we’re all created to work and that nearly all work can be a form of service to God.  In our culture, we split work and discipleship, which often leads to a double standard; we have one set of behaviors for the workplace and another set for the church.  This distinction is somewhat false and does not express God’s plan.

#6 = We were created to choose to obey God (2:16-17). God created people with the ability to choose; “free will.”  This is also a delegated authority and the responsibility that goes with it is to choose to obey God.

We won’t go into any detail here, but will note only that God gave the man commands about work/worship and about one tree in particular; he commanded the man to leave it alone.  This was not a complicated set of commands to keep.  God’s plan was not to leave His people alone and let them figure things out for themselves.  He identified obedience as the thing that leads to life. Jesus taught that obedience is the way we demonstrate our love for God (see John 14:15, 23-24).

# 7 = We were created for companionship (2:18-25).  Another purpose God had in giving Adam the job of naming the animals was he would see that there were a male and female of each.  But the text says twice for Adam THERE WAS NO SUITABLE HELPER to be found.  The phrase “suitable helper” is one of those details I warned you about.  It is hard to interpret as it is found only here in the Bible.  The task has been complicated by centuries of misuse by persons trying to prove a paternalistic world view.

However the word HELPER is found repeatedly by itself in the Bible and is most often used in reference to God as our HELPER.  Obviously, there is no diminished status associated with this word.  A HELPER is not a second-class person.  The word SUITABLE actually means “opposite.”

So a SUITABLE HELPER in this case, is the opposite sex.  As all the animals had male and female genders, Adam needed a counterpart, a female, to be a completed species. This is true biologically, emotionally, and spiritually.  The text give a rare commentary in verse 24 when the writer sums up God’s purpose in making Eve as a counterpart for Adam: THAT IS WHY A MAN LEAVES HIS FATHER AND MOTHER AND IS UNITED TO HIS WIFE, AND THEY BECOME ONE FLESH.

In case we miss the fact that God created both male and female people, the text makes it perfectly obvious in 1:27, SO GOD CREATED MAN IN HIS OWN IMAGE, IN THE IMAGE OF GOD HE CREATED HIM, MALE AND FEMALE HE CREATED THEM.  Both men and women bear the all-important IMAGE OF GOD.  In this detail alone, but also in all of the creation account, the book of Genesis shows far more respect for women than the creation myths recounted in other ancient cultures.  God wants us to know right from the beginning that male and female people are two sides of the same race.

Adam affirms this truth in v. 23.  First, he emphasized the similarity of the sexes when he said Eve was BONE OF MY BONE AND FLESH OF MY FLESH.  Second, he approved her suitability as his counterpart: SHE SHALL BE CALLED ‘WOMAN,’ FOR SHE WAS TAKEN OUT OF MAN.  Of course there are differences between men and women that continue to this day; we’re not aiming at being so “PC” that we deny what is obvious.  But those differences are matters of degree, not destiny.  Men and women are to manage creation together.

#8 = We were created pure, without any reason to be ashamed.  No less than four times (2:25; 3:7, 10-11) the account mentions Adam and even being NAKED.

In chapter two, Adam and Eve were NAKED but without shame.  The point here is their innocence.  As we observe with innocent children, nakedness is not a cause for shame.

In chapter three, Adam and Eve became ashamed of their nakedness after they chose to disobey God.  The first sin brought the first sense of shame along with it.

Different Hebrew words are used in chapters two and three.  In chapter three, the word used for NAKED is elsewhere used as a punishment, a sign of being abandoned, a penalty for sin.  Of course, that comes after the disobedience of Adam and Eve and implies that their nudity was no longer a sign of inn0cence, but something they despised and felt was a punishment; a shameful thing.

The account of Adam and Eve speaks to our personal lives.  Their experience is a symbol for what all of us experience as we grow up, the loss of innocence as we deliberately choose to do what we know is wrong.

Finally, the text revisits the creation of plant life on the land, elaborating that it was created to be food for the LIVING CREATURES (1:29-30: 2:5-6). Yes, I suppose this does imply that all animals and humans were vegetarians in the beginning.  But be of good cheer – God later approved meat for our diet (see Acts 9:9-16)!

The GARDEN depicted in today’s text was a literal place that carried a function similar to that of the tabernacle, temple, and church; it was a place to meet God.  It was a sanctuary where God’s people could go to worship Him.  In fact, what’s clear in this creation account is that the human race is the primary part of creation.  The details we’ve examined all week show that God created with human beings in mind.

God made people to take care of that sacred space and to dwell with Him there.  God said that creation was GOOD and He blessed all the LIVING CREATURES He created to live in the world.

The one thing about it that was NOT GOOD was for the man to live alone in the GARDEN.  God fixed that with the creation of the woman and everything was fine until sin entered the picture in the form of the willful disobedience of Adam and Eve.

Let’s not get ahead of the text.  The second chapter ends with the affirmation that the week of creation ended with God’s plan perfectly in place.  All was prepared for creation to work as a habitation for people.  Adam and Eve lived and worked and served God, all without any SHAME.

PREVIEW

  1. Creation, Day Seven: Instituting the Sabbath (2:1-4).