Advent Angels Sighting #4

Advent Angel Sightings 3_final (1)

 (Image by James Best, (C) 2019, https://www.behance.net/gallery/82544295/Sermon-Illustrations-2019.)

          Please read Luke 2:8-20.

Our focus during Advent has been on the angels.  But this week I’ve read and heard a lot about the shepherds.  One fellow said they were servants of the temple, tending the sheep used for the sacrifices.  Another said they were hiding out, complaining and maybe even plotting against the census that had been ordered by Rome.  I suppose either, neither, or both of those things could be true.

What I believe is indisputable, however, is that these were ordinary joes, working men suddenly overtaken by God and by history in the course of their ordinary lives.  It ought to serve as an inspiration to all of us that God chose to announce the birth of Jesus to ordinary folks.  The angels bypassed the palaces and temple and went to a work site.  The good news came first to people much like us.  That’s God’s justice and maybe His sense of humor.

CONTEXT: The scene is a countryside, which fits with Bethlehem as a rural village and with Luke’s theme of the most important birth happening without the notice of the world’s rich and powerful.  KEEPING WATCH means they were taking shifts looking out for predators and keeping the flocks together.

God sent an army of angels and an army of shepherds to announce the Savior’s birth.

  1. Luke reveals information about angels.

A single angel appeared first and delivered the message.  The angel is not named, but it might have been Gabriel who did all the talking in chapter one.

The situation starts out very much like the other angelic visitations: sudden appearance, glorious light, fearful response, angel says, “Don’t be afraid.”  Another consistent feature is that the message is GOOD NEWS.  Contrary to the angelic message delivered to Mary and Zechariah, this one is not going to affect the size of the shepherds’ families.

It is GOOD NEWS FOR ALL THE PEOPLE.  That is, for all the people of Israel, as directly stated in 1:17, 68, 77.  On the other hand, Luke tended to use this expression to refer to the “common people” as opposed to their religious and political leaders.

It will occur IN THE TOWN OF DAVID; a hint that it will fulfill prophecy.  As we see later, Jesus did not fulfill popular expectations of the Messiah, but He was obedient to fulfill prophecy and the will of God the Father.

A SAVIOR HAS BEEN BORN TO YOU indicates that this baby will be more than just another heir of David.  He will play the pivotal part in God’s salvation.  This is an exceptional verse.  There are three titles mentioned in v.11; SAVIOR, CHRIST (“Messiah” or “Anointed One”), and LORD.  This is the only New Testament text where all three titles appear together.  This is the only time in Luke’s gospel that Jesus is referred to as “Savior.”

THIS WILL BE A SIGN: a circumstance so unique that it will be possible to identify the individual child.  A BABY WRAPPED IN CLOTHS AND LYING IN A MANGER are a mixed message; the CLOTHS imply the baby is wanted and cared-for, but LYING in a manger feels like abandonment. Verse sixteen makes it clear the when they arrived, the shepherds found MARY and JOSEPH there, so the baby was not abandoned after all.

Once the message is delivered, A GREAT COMPANY of angel APPEARED.  A GREAT COMPANY OF THE HEAVENLY HOST uses military terminology, but their activity is not military, it is worship; they glorify God.  Worship of God in heaven seems to be the primary activity of angels and we see it here for the first time.  Given the importance of Jesus’ birth, it makes sense to worship God on this occasion.

The worship promotes the idea that PEACE is the thing God is attempting to achieve here.  The Hebrew word for peace is shalom. Peace is much more than the absence of conflict, a temporary ceasefire.  It is a state of prosperity, security, and harmony, a degree of well-being, a taste of heaven on earth.  In Old Testament prophecy, a state of shalom is associated with the kind of kingdom the Messiah would bring to pass.

Who are the recipients of this peaceful kingdom?  The angels’ hymn says cryptically, MEN ON WHOM HIS FAVOR RESTS.  We don’t have enough information here to know whether this meant the Jews or the Church or both, in their turns.  It doesn’t really matter as the emphasis is not on the MEN, but on God’s FAVOR, or His grace.  Neither the Jews nor the Church deserve God’s FAVOR, so it is purely grace.

The message delivered, the angels returned to HEAVEN.  After all, they came from heaven.

  1. The shepherds responded faithfully.

They responded immediately.  In the same sentence that reports the angels’ return to heaven, the shepherds have decided to go to Bethlehem to check it out (verse fifteen).  Verse sixteen states they HURRIED OFF to Bethlehem.  This detail conveys an immediate response but also implies an enthusiastic one too.

They responded enthusiastically.  All that is reported about the shepherds conveys people who were understandably enthused to have been visited by angels and saw for themselves that the angel’s good news was perfectly true.

They responded worshipfully.  Verse twenty tells us the shepherd glorified and praised God, just as the company of angels had done in verse sixteen.  What they thought was praiseworthy was that God had kept His promises.  Everything the angels announced had come to pass; they had HEARD and SEEN it for themselves.

They responded evangelistically.  Verses seventeen and eighteen tell us the shepherds SPREAD THE WORD.  They reported their encounter with the angels and their meeting the baby and His parents. These verses also report the reaction of those who heard the shepherds’ testimony: ALL WHO HEARD IT WERE AMAZED.  As we’ve seen, amazement is the usual reply when people perceive God at work.

God sent an army of angels and an army of shepherds to announce the Savior’s birth.

What strikes me about Luke chapter two after verse two is that the only people mentioned who are “high and mighty” are the angels.  The HEAVENLY HOST appear in contrast to the powerless people who are named in this chapter.  Jesus is a baby; Joseph, Mary, the shepherds and literally everybody else are peasants.  This alone ought to squelch our ambition to “be somebody” or even get noticed.  We can get tired of our routine, long to escape our ordinariness.  Have you ever been greeted by someone who asked, “What’s new and exciting?”  What did you answer?

The shepherds had an answer to that question.  “Let me tell you something!” they’d say with excited voices.  Here’s something new and exciting: we have exactly the same good news that they did!  Jesus is born!  God has kept all His promises and delivered life and light to everyone in the dark shadow of death.

The angels and the shepherds had the same job, only the shepherds were volunteers.  Their job was to tell the GOOD NEWS.  That is our job too.  We have news to share and in this season we have an abundant opportunity to share it!

 

RESOURCES:

Word Biblical Commentary, Luke 1-9:20, John Nolland

Belief: A Theological Commentary on the Bible, Luke, Justo L. Gonzalez

Advent Angel Sightings #1

hand it to you

Please read Daniel 8:15-27 in your Bible.

A man who lived on Long Island, New York ordered an expensive barometer.  It was advertised as a precision scientific instrument, a reliable guide for predicting the weather.  When it arrived he was extremely disappointed to find that the dial was stuck, pointing to “Hurricane.” After shaking the barometer very vigorously several times, its new owner sat down and wrote a scorching letter to the store from which he had purchased the instrument.  The following morning, on his way to his office in New York, he mailed the letter. That evening he returned to Long Island, to find the barometer missing – along with his house! The barometer had been right. There was a hurricane!

When we receive bad news we have an unfortunate tendency to blame the messenger.  That tendency is at play in Daniel, the scene of our first Advent Angel Sighting in this series of messages.  Daniel lived during the time the Old Testament people of God (Judah) were conquered by the Babylonians.  They suffered this setback in fulfillment of God’s prophecy of 70 years of captivity in a foreign land.  Daniel was the best and brightest young men of Judah.  The Babylonians cultivated his leadership skills and gave him considerable authority in their government.  The story of the lion’s den is a small part of the life of this extraordinary man of God.

CONTEXT: Chapter eight records the second of Daniel’s prophetic visions.  This one involved a supernatural ram and goat locked in an epic struggle.  The appearance of the angel Gabriel is to explain the meaning of the imagery employed in chapters two and seven, which were beyond Daniel’s understanding.

God’s messages demand a faithful – not fearful – response.

  1. Angels are God’s messengers:

their messages can be disturbing.

Here in Daniel eight we learn two things about angels. The first is that angels can take on the appearance of a human being (verse fifteen refers to Gabriel as ONE WHO LOOKED LIKE A MAN).  The Hebrew word for MAN (geber) is literally, “strong man.”  The visitor is named Gabriel, which means “man of God.”  Note the similarity of geber and Gabriel: we could translate his name as “strong man of God.”  If it helps, picture Arnold Schwarzenegger in a robe.

In the Old Testament, only Daniel names angels.  Those named are Gabriel and Michael.  The fact that they are named distinguishes them from the innumerable host of angels and may imply they are of a superior rank.

Notice how Daniel down-plays this event: the angel Gabriel “looks like a man” and the voice of God “sounds like a man’s voice.”  But there is no doubt this is a divine visitation.

Secondly, angels are messengers who deliver God’s messages to people.  As we read in verse sixteen, “GABRIEL, TELL THIS MAN THE MEANING OF THE VISION.”)

Daniel was disturbed by the vision and the visitation.  In verse seventeen he wrote, I WAS TERRIFIED AND FELL PROSTRATE.  Elsewhere in the Bible, we see this self-humiliating pose as typical when approaching royalty.  This was how Esther approached the king in Esther 5:2.  The Apostle John took this position when he encountered the SON OF MAN (Revelation 1:17).

We see this again in verse eighteen: I WAS IN A DEEP SLEEP, WITH MY FACE TO THE GROUND.  This wasn’t a sudden urge for a nap or a swoon. This word for SLEEP is used elsewhere in the Bible to describe a trance-like state in which a prophet receives a vision.  The fact that Gabriel lifted Daniel to his feet with a touch is another detail that gives this scene a supernatural quality.

The encounter took its toll on Daniel, as we see in verse 27: I, DANIEL, WAS EXHAUSTED AND LAY ILL SEVERAL DAYS.  I WAS APPALLED BY THE VISION THAT WAS BEYOND UNDERSTANDING.  We’ve all had the experience of having a nightmare that affected us so profoundly we lose sleep over it.  But not many of us have been so deeply affected that we were ILL for DAYS afterward.

But why was Daniel APPALLED at the message he’d received?  That Hebrew word can also be translated as “desolate, devastated, wasted, helpless,” so it is an extreme condition.  The simplest explanation is that he understood verses nineteen to twenty-five as warning of additional persecutions that would befall God’s people. He may have understandably felt they had already suffered enough and was saddened to hear more was to come.

What can we understand about this vision?  This passage, like all of Daniel’s visions, has been the subject of much speculation by people looking for clues to the end times events that are part of our future.  Based on the text alone, there are three things we can say with certainty.

Firstly, the vision looks to the future from Daniel’s perspective: to THE TIME OF THE END (verses seventeen and nineteen), a time in the DISTANT FUTURE (v. 26).  The expression THE TIME OF WRATH is used four ways in the Old Testament:

– One, for God’s wrath against His people for their unfaithfulness.

– Two, for God’s wrath against the foreign nations who made themselves enemies of His people and persecuted them.

– Three, the term marks the end of one historical era and the  beginning of another.

– Four, the end of reality as we know it; the putting away of the physical universe to replace it with an eternal creation.  We are tempted to assume the vision depicts God’s WRATH against the wicked at Judgment Day, but we need to be careful to note the context and determine which of the four meanings is appropriate to the text before and after it.

Secondly, verse 25 tells us this vision depicts the victory of God over the forces of evil in the world.  The fact is that the time of evil is limited and that God will win.  Apocalyptic literature like Daniel’s visions are given to encourage the faithful to resist the temptation to give up.  We are to be steadfast in our faith because we are assured the time of our trials is limited and that the end of the story is that God wins.

Thirdly, as this vision was BEYOND the UNDERSTANDING to a great man of faith like Daniel, we must approach it humbly.  As God gives us wisdom to attempt to understand it, we must give grace to others whose interpretations may not agree with ours.

  1. How are we to react to disturbing messages?

We can do no better than to follow Daniel’s example – humble yourself and pray (as we read Daniel’s prayer in chapter nine).  It was humbling for Daniel to admit he could not UNDERSTAND all the implications of this vision.

Chapter nine records a prayer of worship, recounting God’s mighty deeds on behalf of His people in times past.  It’s as if Daniel is reminding God He has been merciful with His people in the past in the hope He will show them mercy in the present.

In the Bible anyway, angel sightings are almost always shocking events.  Again, following Daniel’s example, we should be shocked into action, not frozen with fear.  Notice in verse 27 that the vision laid Daniel out for SEVERAL DAYS, he GOT UP AND WENT ABOUT THE KING’S BUSINESS.

After the vision had been explained to Daniel, the angel Gabriel ordered him to SEAL it up until the time the prophecy was fulfilled.  This command was a common feature of apocalyptic literature.

However, Daniel obeyed this command in an interesting way.  He did not put a physical seal on it, but a linguistic one.  Chapters two through seven of Daniel were written in Aramaic, a commonly used language in Daniel’s time, one his Babylonian captors would have readily known.  From chapter eight on, Daniel wrote in Hebrew – his home language – something his Babylonian overseers would not likely have been able to read.

The Apostle Paul would come along 100s of years later and explain the MYSTERY of the Gospel, revealing God’s plan for salvation as realized by Jesus Christ.  In effect, he was opening and explaining the salvation significance of OT prophecies like Daniel’s.

God’s messages demand a faithful – not fearful – response.

          Preparing this message, I searched “angel sightings,” and as you can guess, there was quite a variety of stuff on the web related to that title.  One website had a page where they had photographic evidence of the existence of angels.  Another one offered similar claims of sightings of Santa Claus.  This is a problem that occurs when we try to convince people of the reality of spiritual things by using earthly means.  I wonder why an angel would bother to mask his appearance to the naked eye but allow his picture to be taken.

It is a hard balance to achieve, but I believe it’s good to retain a healthy dose of skepticism when people want to use science to prove faith.  Angel sightings and miracles are a couple instances where the line gets blurred and it makes me skeptical about the means and the motive.

So we will limit our search for angels to the pages of Scripture.  My prayer is that our search will be part of for our Advent search for the Christ child, our personal spiritual preparations to celebrate His birth.  Keep your eyes and your heart open to God’s messages to you in this Advent season.

 

Resources:

Zondervan NIV Exhaustive Concordance

Zondervan Bible Commentary, Daniel, A. R. Millard

Kingdom Come, Sam Storms

The Daily Study Bible Series, Daniel, D. S. Russell

The Expositor’s Bible Commentary, #11, Daniel, Gleason L. Archer, Jr.

https://www.sermoncentral.com/sermon-illustrations/19164/in-september-1938-a-man-who-lived-on-long-by-stephen-wright?ref=TextIllustrationDetails

Advent Attitude: Joy

Advent 1

(Please read Luke 2:8-20 & 1 Peter 1:3-12 from your Bible.  I used the NIV (1984) to conduct my research.)

Last Christmas, grandpa was feeling his age and found that shopping for Christmas gifts had become too difficult. So he decided to send checks to everyone instead.  In each card he wrote, “Buy your own present!” and mailed them early.
In the usual flurry of family festivities he noticed the grandkids were a bit cold to him; a couple were downright angry. Puzzled over this, he went into his study to get some time alone to think about it. It was then he saw the gift checks which he had forgotten to enclose with the cards.

(https://www.favecrafts.com/Entertaining/A-Great-Bunch-of-Funny-Christmas-Stories)

Today we begin a journey that will end at a cattle pen near a village that had a lot of history, but not much to recommend it at the moment.  Advent is a significant time in the church calendar, one of two seasons of preparation.  I felt lead, this Advent, to explore some of the reactions to Jesus that people in the Bible demonstrated.  My prayer is that these studies will encourage us to be mindful of our own Advent Attitudes.

This thought is not original to me.  Darrell L. Bock expressed a similar line of thought in his commentary of the Gospel of Luke: “The variety of reactions to the birth of Jesus noted here should not surprise us.  People respond to him differently.  Some are amazed, but do not engage him at any deeper level.  Others offer praise, while others ponder what Jesus means.  There is no doubt that in this passage Mary and the shepherds are the exemplary characters, reflecting the testimony and obedience that should characterize saints.”  (p. 89-90)

We begin this series with JOY because it is the most common reaction to the birth of Jesus.  With the exception of King Herod, everybody in the biblical accounts seems really thrilled that God has brought this about.

Jesus brings joy to His people.

  1. Jesus’ birth brought joy to the Shepherds (Luke 2)

The angels predicted the Holy Birth would bring GOOD NEWS OF GREAT JOY to ALL THE PEOPLE (10).  GOOD NEWS is the Greek word from which we get our English word “gospel.”  It is significant that very word was used to announce the birth of Emperor Augustus.  Luke tried to evoke a similar vibe among his readers.

The angels promised GREAT JOY.  It was “great” in the sense of being giant-sized.  The size of the JOY is measured by the size of the recipients: ALL THE PEOPLE.  The size of the JOY is measured by the reactions of the shepherds.

Then angels promised that God intended this joy to be for ALL THE PEOPLE.  This is one measure of the significance of Jesus’ birth: it is important not to just one family or even one nation, but to ALL PEOPLE.  This is also the reason why the world must know and part of what motivated the shepherds to go and spread the word.  For us as well, the world must know so we must go tell them.

Another measure of the JOY is how the shepherds wasted no time checking it out (vs. 15-16).  They quickly agreed this was worth looking into and decided to go together (v. 15).  In fact, verse sixteen testifies that they HURRIED OFF to find the family in Bethlehem.

They wasted no time, spreading the word immediately (vs. 20, 16-17).  This is another reaction you’d anticipate from someone feeling GREAT JOY.

Luke may have these verses a little out of chronological order.  In terms of how the events happened, verse 20 should precede verses seventeen to nineteen.  Verse twenty describes the immediate effect on the shepherds; verses seventeen to nineteen describe the effect of their testimony on others.

First, the shepherds worshiped God.  Luke wrote that they returned to their flocks GLORIFYING AND PRAISING GOD.  They were gratified they’d had seen the Savior with their own eyes, that everything was just as the angels had promised.

Second, they told everyone about it.  The response to their excited witness is amazement (v. 18), except for Mary, who treasured these revelations and PONDERED them (v. 19).

  1. Jesus’ life brings joy to His followers (1PR 1).

Jesus Joy gets us through tough times (v. 6).  Peter wrote about our LIVING HOPE; a future God created for us through the RESURRECTION OF JESUS CHRIST.  This HOPE shields us, protecting us until our salvation is REVEALED IN THE LAST TIME.  He wrote IN THIS YOU GREATLY REJOICE.  Remember, the angels announcing Jesus’ birth said it was GOOD NEWS OF GREAT JOY.  Here is that expression again.

The JOY Jesus brings helps us endure GRIEF from ALL KINDS OF TRIALS.  Verse seven explains God’s purpose in trials; he uses them to “refine” our faith, the most precious thing we have.  While we might prefer that God refine our faith by gentler means, it is in trials that we most appreciate the value of our relationship with God.

Peter also encourages us to know our TRIALS – even the ones that are life-long – are only temporary.  They last only FOR A LITTLE WHILE.  Heaven is eternal.  In trials we most eagerly desire our deliverance, our salvation.

Jesus Joy is INEXPRESSIBLE and GLORIOUS because it is based on our salvation (vs. 8+9).  Jesus Joy is so wonderful, so supernatural, Peter wrote that it is INEXPRESSIBLE! This JOY is so deep it challenges our vocabulary to describe it.  It challenges our hearts to contain it.  It challenges us to properly express it in our words and deeds.  It is so contrary to ordinary worldly experiences, it defies all attempts to draw comparisons.

GLORIOUS means it is divine (from God).  It reflects the being, character, and will of God.  As our salvation comes from Him, so does this JOY that flows from our salvation.

In the Greek New Testament, the word JOY is written in the form of a command.  Peter is not just saying JOY is available to them, he is commanding them to observe it.

Jesus brings joy to His people.

It was the last case before the court went on Christmas break.  The judge was to wrap it up and allow everyone to leave.  Without waiting for the bailiff to announce the case, the judge barked at the prisoner, “What are you charged with?”
The prisoner replied, “Doing my Christmas shopping too early.”
“That’s no crime,” said the judge. “Just how early were you doing this shopping?”
“Before the store opened,” he said.

(https://www.favecrafts.com/Entertaining/A-Great-Bunch-of-Funny-Christmas-Stories)

I don’t imagine that guy made it home for Christmas.  When all your plans and the extra responsibilities of the season threaten to make you crazy, do us all a favor and remember the first and greatest Advent Attitude is JOY.  Begin each day of Advent with that thought and see how it transforms the season.  Seek joy for yourself and to share it with others.

 

RESOURCES:

Sermon #1187

The Expositor’s Bible Commentary, Edwin A. Blume.

The NIV Bible Application Commentary, Darrell L. Bock.

Joyous Discovery

(Please read Luke 2:8-20, NLT.)

Thesis – Advent is a time of joyous discovery for each of us as we celebrate the ancient discovery of Jesus’ birth.

One of the contrasts in this passage is between the messengers and the recipients.  Angels are a different race of beings entirely.  They are God’s messengers and heavenly worshipers, but they also exist to assist us.  They are mysterious and exalted beings and the Bible testifies that they often work among and pass for regular human beings.

Shepherds, on the other hand, were the most ordinary folk you’d hope to find in that ancient culture.  Their vocation was mostly viewed positively in the Bible, but in Jesus’ time they were belittled as unclean, untrustworthy folk.

The angels announced the ultimate reason for joy (8-14).

          In vs. 10-11, 14 we find the angelic message.  It details what’s happening, when, where, how, and why.  We’ll examine all ten parts of their message.

  • “DON’T BE AFRAID.”  When angels appear in their glorious, heavenly, form, they are intimidating visually and physically.  We know this because people are always afraid when they appear.  We know this because the text says so, THEY WERE TERRIBLY FRIGHTENED; and because the angel always says, “DON’T BE AFRAID.”
  • “I BRING YOU GOOD NEWS…”  This phrase had cultural significance; the birth of Augustus Caesar was announced as “good news” of the birth of a “savior.”  This is a case of Luke using the empire’s own language against them.
  • “…OF GREAT JOY…”  This is our key to the passage.  The birth of Jesus brought great joy then and it should now as well.
  • “…FOR EVERYONE!”  The salvation God offers thru Jesus is universal in its scope but conditional in its effects: you have to receive it by faith.  Otherwise, it is not effective; God chooses not save or condemn anyone against their own will.
  • “THE SAVIOR”  It is abundantly plain in the birth narratives that the purpose of Jesus’ birth is to be the Savior of all humankind.  It is firmly rooted in OT prophecies (see Deuteronomy 20:4; Joshua 22:22; Psalms 24:4; 25:5; Isaiah 25:9).  It was actually a widely-used term term at that time; physicians, rulers & philosophers were called “saviors.”  Curiously, it is the only time Luke uses SAVIOR to refer to Jesus.
  • “THE MESSIAH”  The Greek version of this word is “Christ,” and the word means “The Anointed One.”  It is rarely used in the Old Testament, but the Messiah was nonetheless widely expected by Jews of that time.
  • “THE LORD”  This is a title of respect akin to “sir.”  It was commonly used to pay respects to men in positions of authority.
  • “HAS BEEN BORN TONIGHT…IN THE CITY OF DAVID” = These two, taken together, highlight the immediacy of the blessed event.  The shepherds had the honor of being the first eyewitnesses on the scene.
  • “GLORY TO GOD IN THE HIGHEST HEAVEN”  As is the case with all of life, our ultimate purpose is to direct people’s attention to God; that’s what it means to “glorify” Him.  God is the greatest good and the biggest favor we can do to one another is to draw attention to Him.
  • “PEACE ON EARTH TO ALL WHOM GOD FAVORS.”  (See Luke 10:21.) This phrase affirms what we noted earlier; God’s salvation provides the possibility of everyone being saved, but some will reject it. God’s favor rests on those who accept His gracious offer by faith.  Because they are saved, they will have PEACE, even ON EARTH. Including the shepherds demonstrates that God’s favor rested on them.  They represent the common person.  Having wealth or fame or power does not indicate God’s favor – those men had none of those things.

The sign that verified the truthfulness of the message is found in verse twelve. This is an excellent sign – it is so unusual as to be unmistakable: “A BABY IN A MANGER, WRAPPED SNUGLY IN STRIPS OF CLOTH.”  A baby occupying a manger might’ve been taken as a cast-off, abandoned and exposed, left to die.  (Like a baby left alone on a park bench.)

However, wrapping a baby in strips of cloth is a sign of caring.  This practice was done to keep the baby’s limbs straight and to keep it warm; to help it survive. According to Scripture, all prophecy is proven to have come from God when it comes true.  The angels have made some BIG PROMISES here and having a sign to back them up is a very good thing!

The shepherds and Mary discovered it for themselves (15-20).

          You can tell the shepherds were excited about the news (see 15-17, 20).

  • As soon as the messengers had disappeared, they were on their way to Bethlehem.
  • Listen to the way they described the good news; “THIS WONDERFUL THING.”
  • Look at the happy haste they showed: THEY RAN TO THE VILLAGE.
  • Hear the joy in their voices as they TOLD EVERYONE WHAT HAD HAPPENED AND WHAT THE ANGEL HAD TOLD THEM ABOUT THIS CHILD.
  • Watch them go back to work, GLORIFYING AND PRAISING GOD…BECAUSE THEY HAD SEEN THE CHILD, JUST AS THE ANGEL HAD SAID.  We can be this way, can’t we?  We believe in God and yet are still surprised when He answers our prayers with a “yes” or does things we didn’t expect Him to do.  The shepherds were pleased to have been included in this divine event and they wouldn’t stop talking about it.  It would be great if we followed their example in THIS way!

Jesus’ mother Mary quietly joined the shepherds in their excitement (v. 19).

  • MARY QUIETLY TREASURED THESE THINGS IN HER HEART. Celebrations do not have to be loud and raucous to be true.  Worship occurs just as readily in quiet and reflective moments as it does in more demonstrative ways. The faithful response of all disciples is to perceive the will of God and then act upon it.
  • AND THOUGHT ABOUT THEM OFTEN.  This word refers to deep reflection on a topic; it literally meant “get it all together.”  It also translated as waging war (see Luke 14:31) and carrying on a conversation (see Acts 17:18).  So Mary really wrestled with these things, trying to figure out what it all meant.  This too is a good example for us to follow; to dwell on the word of God, to meditate on it and apply it to daily living.

Though the birth of Jesus was a private event – just Mary and Joseph – it did not stay that way long.  Soon afterward, a group of shepherds showed up, having received instructions and directions from a whole army of angels. Whether we receive the news exuberantly, as the shepherds did, or quietly, as Mary did, the point is that we receive this news.  Advent is a time of joyous discovery for each of us as we celebrate the ancient discovery of Jesus’ birth.