Last Supper, Last Words (1 of 5)

gentle

Please read John 13:18-32 in your favored version of the Bible.  I used the NIV (1984) to research these remarks.

While watching the Olympics recently, I saw that one of the networks has jumped on the recent live musicals fad to offer “Jesus Christ, Superstar” on Easter.  Personally, I don’t recommend watching it.

Since its first performance the rock opera “Superstar” has fueled debate about its portrayal of the biblical events.  We don’t have time to get into all that this morning, but I mention it because one of the failings of the musical is that it is about Judas, not Jesus, and it mistakenly portrays him as being politically motivated to betray Jesus.

The Bible, on the other hand, gives two motives for Judas’ actions.  One is greed.  He embezzled from the group’s purse and asked for a bribe to turn Jesus over to the leaders who wanted him dead.

The second motive is one we will see in today’s passage: the evil influence of Satan.  Judas acted in free will but he eventually became so committed to betraying Jesus that he actually sold out to the devil.  Judas’ character is a startling contrast to Jesus’.

Jesus’ gentleness to His betrayer is an example for us to follow.

  1. Jesus predicted His betrayal. (13:18-21)

Verse eighteen shows two things about Jesus.  One, I KNOW THOSE I HAVE CHOSEN means He knew the hearts of His disciples and loved them anyway.  Remember, He washed 12 pairs of feet.

The depth of Jesus’ love is powerfully illustrated in his treatment of Judas.  Jesus blessed the disciples in verse seventeen.  However, lest Judas think that he was part of that blessing Jesus said, “I AM NOT REFERRING TO ALL OF YOU.”  Judas’ betrayal was not worthy of blessing.  Just the opposite; he is cursed.  In Matthew 26:24 Jesus said, “The Son of Man will go just as it is written about him. But woe to that man who betrays the Son of Man! It would be better for him if he had not been born.”

Two, it was part of His mission to fulfill prophecy.  Jesus fulfilled prophecy by His choice to be obedient to God’s will and Judas by his choice to disobey.

Jesus quoted Psalm 41:9 to give the disciples insight into His emotional state.  He quoted all but the first part; EVEN MY FRIEND, WHOM I TRUSTED.  In this Psalm, David complained to God about his enemies, including his own son, Absalom, who betrayed him.  Jesus is saying that this Psalm has both historical and predictive elements.

He elaborated by using the most dastardly deed done by a trusted friend.  There are two seemingly contradictory phrases in verse eighteen:

SHARES MY BREAD indicates friendship, family, intimacy, and  hospitality.

LIFTED UP HIS HEEL refers to an Eastern expression for showing contempt to another.  These insights reveal the striking and emotional nature of Jesus’ words.

In verse nineteen Jesus paradoxically revealed His betrayal in order to help His disciples understand who He was: “SO THAT WHEN IT DOES HAPPEN YOU WILL BELIEVE THAT I AM HE.”  In this sense, verse nineteen is a word of prophecy.  When it comes true, the disciples are to consider it proof that Jesus is who He claims to be: the Son of God.

In verse twenty Jesus revealed that He and the Father were one and the disciples would join them in that unity of character and purpose.  Thus, anyone who accepted the disciples, accepted Him and anyone who accepted Him accepted God the Father.

Verse twenty-one shows the human side of Jesus’ nature.  The fact that His heart was TROUBLED may indicate a hope to receive  comfort from His disciples.  This would be a natural expectation from a human being.  Moreover, the text says Jesus was DEEPLY TROUBLED; that is the same word used to describe Jesus’ emotion in 11:33 when he saw the grief of people at Lazarus’ tomb.

  1. Jesus revealed His betrayer. (13:22-26)

As plain as Jesus made the “big reveal,” the twelve still didn’t get it (22).  HIS DISCIPLES STARED AT ONE ANOTHER: This is the kind of detail an eye-witness would mention. It is how you would expect folks to react to such a surprise.  They were AT A LOSS TO KNOW WHAT HE MEANT.  This happens a lot in the Gospels.

In verses twenty-three to twenty-five, questions were raised. Notably, by THE DISCIPLE WHOM JESUS LOVED, who has traditionally been identified as John.

Simon Peter’s rush to know specifics fits with what we know of his character.  Making use of his being next to Jesus, John simply asked Him, “LORD, WHO IS IT?”

Judas is unmistakably identified in verses twenty-six and twenty-seven.   Jesus’ answer was confusing at first.

At a time when bread was used in place of tableware, it was customary to use bread to scoop up meat or some other dish as one ate.  (As our Ethiopian brothers and sisters do today.)  It was also customary for the host of a dinner to make a point of giving a special morsel to honor a guest.

When Jesus chose this means of identifying His betrayer, it seemed that He was honoring and exposing Judas at the same time.  I believe Jesus is showing grace to Judas, showing him love, and maybe offering him one last chance to repent of his decision.

  1. Satan entered Judas. (13: 27)

The phrase SATAN ENTERED INTO HIM is extraordinary.  Let’s explore what it means.

Don’t miss the detail in verse twenty-seven; AS SOON AS JUDAS TOOK THE BREAD, SATAN ENTERED INTO HIM.  Judas’ willingly receiving the bread is his way of accepting his role, the moment of his decision to accept the role of betrayer, and his ultimate sell-out to Satan.  There was nothing “magical” about the bread; it is the act of accepting it when Jesus had specifically imbued it with meaning that has Judas crossing a line that demarked the “point of no return.”

This phrase marks a clear break between Judas the disciple and Judas the betrayer.  Judas gave up on any “second thoughts” or temptation to back out for any reason.  It means that Judas gave himself fully to the evil purpose that was the devil’s will.  Back in 6:70-71 we read, THEN JESUS REPLIED, “HAVE I NOT CHOSEN YOU, THE TWELVE?  YET ONE OF YOU IS A DEVIL!”  (HE MEANT JUDAS, THE SON OF SIMON ISCARIOT, WHO, THOUGH ONE OF THE TWELVE, WAS LATER TO BETRAY HIM.)

In Mark 5:12 and Luke 8:30 this phrase refers to evil spirits being sent into a herd of swine, which then drowned themselves.  Talk about spiritual evil and its deadly effects!

Jesus dismissed Judas with the words, “WHAT YOU ARE ABOUT TO DO, DO QUICKLY.”  I can think of reasons for Jesus to send Judas away.  One is to make the rest of the Last Supper time spent only with the eleven.  The other is to get the sequence of events leading to His crucifixion started.

Judas wasted no time: AS SOON AS JUDAS TOOK THE BREAD, HE WENT OUT.  The mention of NIGHT is historically accurate, but also symbolic; in John’s Gospel, NIGHT describes moments when evil reigns.

  1. Judas left to enact his betrayal. (13:27-30)

Verse twenty-seven makes it clear Jesus understood fully Judas’ role in what was to happen that night.  He had already predicted many times that it would happen.  Jesus knew when He would be betrayed, who would betray Him, and why it was necessary He be betrayed.  But now time was running out; He needed to get Judas going to move events along.

Skip ahead to verse thirty.  Did Judas feel exposed and that’s why left quickly?  Did he worry about reprisals or being restrained by the eleven?  Was their any guilt or shame in his heart or had the devil pushed all that away?

His emotional/spiritual condition aside, by getting up and leaving, Judas made a further choice ally himself with the devil’s purpose and committed himself again to the course of betrayal.  Ironically, this was one occasion where he was obedient to Jesus’ command.

Go back to verses twenty-eight and twenty-nine.  For their part, the disciples still didn’t get it: NO ONE AT THE MEAL UNDERSTOOD WHY JESUS SAID THIS TO [Judas].

They thought Jesus had sent Judas on a typical kind of errand SINCE JUDAS HAD CHARGE OF THE MONEY.  It was customary to give offerings to the poor as a means of observing the Passover. They rationalized; maybe Judas went out TO BUY WHAT WAS NEEDED FOR THE FEAST or TO GIVE SOMETHING TO THE POOR. These events happened during the most holy of Jewish holy days; the Passover, which was a feast day.  It’s human nature to find the ordinary in things we don’t understand.

  1. Jesus spoke to His glorification. (13:31-32)

The key word here is NOW (verse thirty-one).  Our Bibles separate verses thirty and thirty-one into different sections; I think this is incorrect because the word NOW links them.  This means there was something about Judas’ going forth that glorified Jesus as God the Son and also God the Father.

GLORY is the presence of God manifest in one or both of two ways: in light (a supernatural radiance visible to the eyes) and/or in acts of divine power; miracles.  In this situation, Jesus promised His disciples God’s presence was going to be revealed in a way they had been warned about but still did not expect: Jesus’ resurrection.

Jesus’ response to Judas’ betrayal was gracious and dignified.  We must be characterized by such behavior when we deal with those who oppose or persecute us.

As He did in other teachings (17:22), Jesus is directly attesting to the unity between Himself as God the Son and God the Father.  The chain of acceptance (verse twenty) and the chain of glorification (verse thirty-two) both explore aspects of the unity present between God and His people, also between members of the Trinity.

Jesus’ gentleness to His betrayer is an example for us to follow.

            So there you have it.  Whatever else may have been rummaging around in his head, Judas betrayed Jesus for money.  He was so sold out to the idea of betraying Jesus that the devil became his partner.

This depth of betrayal is too stunning for us to take in.  That’s one reason some people have sought to make excuses for Judas; to humanize him or at least make his decision a more ordinary thing.

Another mistake we make about Judas is thinking we’re nothing like him.  The Bible makes it plain that every sin is an act of betrayal.  It is rebellion against God.  Every sin carries the same deadly consequences as Judas’ treachery.

The good news is that Jesus has shown us the same tender mercy He showed Judas in the upper room.  He gives us multiple chances to repent and resist the devil.  He offers forgiveness that is complete and eternal.

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Lent is for You

repentance

Please read Luke 3:7-14 in your Bible.  I’ve used the NIV 1984 to prepare these remarks.

          USA Today called it “Date confusion;” as this year Ash Wednesday falls on St. Valentine’s Day and worse, Easter on April Fools’ Day.  Writer Ann Zaniewski of the Detroit Free Press sagely predicted, “Christian couples might celebrate their love next month with smudges of ash on their foreheads.  And a prank or two could infiltrate Easter Egg hunts.”

This quirky calendar coincidence hasn’t happened since 1945 and will not occur again until 2024.  Ned McGrath, director of communications for the Archdiocese of Detroit commented, “For the record, the last time there was a confluence of these dates — 1945 — the Detroit Tigers won a World Series. No joke. I’m just saying.”

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2018/01/06/ash-wednesday-valentines-day-easter-april-fools-day/1004317001/

Leaders in Chicago’s Roman Catholic Church are offered this guidance: “Solemnly mark the start of Lent, a day the faithful are asked to abstain from meat and to fast, on Wednesday. Celebrate love over a steak dinner and candles another day.”

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-met-ash-wednesday-valentines-day-20180207-story.html

It seems to me that we’re missing the point here.  We have an opportunity to observe, just once every eighty years – give or take – that LOVE was expressed on the cross of Jesus Christ.  LOVE motivates us to repent and do better.  Rather than just the cheapened version of love, we’ve been given a rather obvious opportunity to LOVE.

At Easter I’ll show how God made a fool of the devil with the empty tomb!!

“Repent, for the Kingdom of God is at hand,” was the heart (pun intended) of Jesus’ message (LKE 5:31-32; 19:10) and the message He commanded His disciples carry to the world (LKE 24:43-47).  Ash Wednesday is the day in the traditional year devoted to repentance.  Today we’ll look at JTB’s take:

Repentance is a single act and a way of life.

  1. Context: John’s ministry was to preach a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins. (3:1-6)
  2. John preached that repentance requires bearing FRUIT in KEEPING with a changed life. (3:7-14)

His sermon included a stern warning (3:7-9).

Verse seven has some tough talk: VIPERS and WRATH.  These people are coming out to him; treating potential converts this was counter-intuitive, to say the least.

Matthew’s version clarifies John’s sternness – these remarks were probably directed at the PHARISEES and SADUCEES – religious leaders who’d probably come out to spy on and maybe oppose John.

Because of the Gospels, the name PHARISEE has become a byword for hypocrite.  That is certainly one reason they were always at odds with Jesus.  Worse, they turned their inflated legalism on others, creating burdens impossible to bear (see Luke 11:46).  The SADDUCEES were a larger party of Jewish religious leaders who collaborated with the Romans, often to line their pockets.  Whenever the Gospels say these two parties were working together, we should know that was a rare occasion and happened only when they saw a worse threat.

What was threatening about John?  First, in Jewish practice, baptism was reserved for people not born Jews who converted to Judaism or Jews undergoing an extreme rededication of faith.  John was using baptism in a new way; baptism for repentance for all people.  John’s baptism created a doctrinal stir and that’s probably what caught the interest of the Pharisees.

Second, John was preaching about the Christ, the promised Messiah, as foretold in Scripture.  This kind of talk got people wound up.  The CROWDS gathering were an occasion for a riot.  That would’ve made the Sadducees feel defensive.

The word VIPERS refers to poisonous snakes, which most of us would consider a physical and emotional threat.  When there is a fire in the desert, snakes will come out their holes in the ground to flee the flames, which leads to the other provocative word, WRATH.  This is a warning of God’s just punishment of all non-believers which will occur on the Day of the Lord (see Isaiah 13:9; 30:23; Ezekiel 7:19; Zephaniah 1:18; Malachi 3:2; Romans 1:18; 1 Thessalonians 1:10; Hebrews 10:27).

Real repentance requires righteous FRUIT.  Repentance itself is not a work; it’s a change of direction based on sorrow over sin and a decision to discontinue it.  However, a genuine change of mind leads to good fruit; actions that are godly in character.

In verse eight we find another warning: don’t rely on being Abraham’s kids.  John tells them their ancestry dating back to Abraham is worthless toward salvation: “OUT OF THESE STONES GOD CAN RAISE UP CHILDREN TO ABRAHAM.”

John warned them that God is so powerful He can come by CHILDREN TO ABRAHAM pretty cheaply.  It’s nothing special and will NOT save them from God’s wrath.

At His Triumphal Entry Jesus was told to quiet His disciples.  Jesus’ reply was that if the people kept quiet, the stones beneath their feet would “cry out.” (see Luke 19:40).  In addition to Abraham’s physical descendants, all who believe are spiritual descendants (see Romans 4:11-16; 9:8; Galatians 3:7+29).

And in verse nine, John warned them God’s wrath is on fruitlessness and it was imminent: “THE AX IS ALREADY A/T ROOT OF THE TREES” = irreversible judgment.  Individuals are like trees in that they produce either GOOD FRUIT by godly living or bad fruit by godless living, sin.  The call to repentance is to turning away from evil and toward God.  Our new orientation will bear FRUIT.

In verses ten through fourteen John refined what he meant by FRUIT IN KEEPING WITH REPENTANCE.  The word repentance literally means “turning.”  It is a change of mind, direction.

What’s exciting about this passage is that each of these three groups of people had the insight to ask John “What must I do?”  They got John’s warnings and more deeply understood repentance is manifest in actions.

John did not use or set up a legalism.  Instead, he personalized what repentance would be for each of the groups.

To the general population (the CROWD), he used the example of TWO TUNICS and FOOD.  A TUNIC was a shirt-like garment, the main clothing worn by a person of the time.  A robe was worn over this.  At that time, most people had only ONE TUNIC and everyone wore only one at a time.

John’s principle was to share your surplus.  His example of FRUIT IN KEEPING WITH REPENTANCE was to suggest that whatever you have in surplus – beyond what it takes to satisfy your immediate needs – you should provide for those who have none.  We Americans typically have closets full of clothes, pantries and freezers full of food, more than we need.  We can demonstrate we are God’s people is by turning our surplus into support.

Addressing the tax collectors (12-13), John’s example was to meet your need, not your greed.  Tax collectors were locals who contracted with the Romans to charge taxes.  They realized a profit by charging more than what was required and pocketed the difference.

John’s repentance principle was “Save, don’t shave the sheep.” There’s a difference between making a living and making a killing.

To the soldiers (14) John gave three commands, but one example: don’t be abusive of your authority. These were likely King Herod’s soldiers and/or temple guards who accompanied the Pharisees and Sadducees.  It took guts for them to admit to considering John’s baptism right in front of their bosses.

Command number one: “DON’T EXTORT MONEY.”  It was common for soldiers to intimidate people and take bribes.  The word EXTORT means “to shake violently,” hence our slang term, “shake down.”

Command number two: “DON’T ACCUSE PEOPLE FALSELY.” The word of a soldier was always taken over a citizen’s, which is an obvious occasion for abuse.

Command number three: “BE CONTENT WITH YOUR PAY” is asking a lot.  Soldiers were underpaid, relying on bribes to make more money.

This is also John’s repentance principle: be content.  John is not just teaching a moral principle; he is also giving sound financial advice.  Repentant people are content with what they have; they don’t cheat or get themselves into debt simply to have better things.

  1. Context: John made it clear he was not the Christ, only His precursor. (3:15-20)

Repentance is a single act and a way of life.

Regardless of our individuality and circumstances, repentance is something we all must practice and it brings forth a character that is generous and refuses to abuse authority.  This Wednesday night we enter into the traditional season of Lent.  Lent is a period of preparation for Easter.  A particular focus of Lent is repentance.  We need to give additional time, thought, and prayer to turning away from sin AND turning to God.

Starting Wednesday night, here’s your homework.  Keep a pad of paper and pen next to your bed.  Before you lay your head down at night, list three sins you committed that day – either by omission or commission.  Ask God to forgive you those sins.  Cross them off to indicate they are forgiven. Next to each, write the opposite kind of action.  This would be something godly you can do instead.  Then, in the morning, circle those three things and go out and do them the next day.  Imagine what great things can be accomplished if we would commit to this kind of discipline over the 40 days of Lent!

Yeah, I Fell For It

This week I became aware of something surprising that transpired way back in 2011.  That year, without making it public knowledge, Zondervan published a revised edition of the New International Version, not doing anything to alert buyers of any differences between the 2011 version and the beloved original version (referred to here as the 1984 version).

Counting the verses, the 2011 NIV is 40% different from the 1984 NIV.  This accounts for the difference between what I have been reading/quoting in the last year and what you may have been reading in your NIV Bibles.

About a year ago I wanted a larger print pulpit Bible and assumed NIV was NIV.  I looked, because I’d heard about the “Today’s NIV” Bible and wanted no part of that. Sad to say, it wasn’t so.  From what I’ve learned about Zondervan’s antics and the 2011 NIV itself, I will go back to 1984 NIV.  I am sorry for any confusion.

As others have observed, Zondervan learned from the “New Coke” nonsense of a previous generation and made no announcements about the switch.  The just renamed “Today’s NIV,” dropping the “Today’s” part.  If you are an unwary buyer (like me, six years after the fact), then it’s too bad, so sad.

What’s it Worth to You?

time is money

Please read Philippians 3:7-11 in your Bible before answering this question: “What’s it Worth to You?”

A pastor went to the hospital to visit a lady named Maggy, who was in the last stages of her life because of cancer.  She was heavily medicated and unresponsive, so he went to support her family, who was taking it hard.

When he got there, he was surprised to see the youngest daughter, Kimmy, putting lotion on her mother’s body, starting at her feet. The pastor recognized it as an expensive lotion and guessed it was more than she could afford.

As he walked in, Kimmy smiled and made him promise not to tell her children. Her kids gave it to her for Mother’s Day, since, in their words, “you never do anything for yourself, Mom.” As Kimmy put it on her mother, she remained unresponsive.

But this is the nature of a self-sacrificial love.  God knows and sees these acts. They are not unnoticed, but are precious and valuable in His sight. Acts like these put others first. They point us to Him.

https://www.sermoncentral.com/illustrations/sermon-illustration-nickolas-kooi-stories-service-100035?+ref=TextIllustrationSerps

We live and die to attain eternal life.

  1. Spiritual maturity requires self-sacrifice.

We are blessed to have a number of biblical examples of heroic sacrifice.

“Father Abraham’s” sacrifice is dramatically recounted in Genesis 22.  As we learned recently-concluded study in the Wednesday morning Bible study group, God had promised to make Abraham into a great nation.  However, at age 100, he had no children.  So when Isaac, the son of promise, was born it seemed at last God’s promises had been fulfilled.  Try to imagine how devastated Abraham must have felt when God demanded Abraham sacrifice Isaac.  Abraham is credited as a hero of faith because he acted immediately and in complete obedience.  God spared Isaac’s life and fulfilled every promise.

John the Baptist’s act of self–sacrifice is recounted in John 3:30 where he makes one of the greatest but most brief statements of faith.  When one of his disciples complained that Jesus and His disciples were getting all the baptisms and attention, John replied, “HE MUST BECOME GREATER; I MUST BECOME LESS.”  John knew his role and he knew his place.  He selflessly sacrificed the spotlight to the One he had come to proclaim.

Remembered as “the Doubter,” Thomas showed courage, when Jesus could not be persuaded to stay away from Jerusalem where danger threatened.  In John 11:16, Thomas said to the other eleven disciples, “LET US ALSO GO, THAT WE MAY DIE WITH HIM.”  I grant you that Thomas’ courage faltered in the Garden of Gethsemane.  There he abandoned Jesus at the moment of His arrest.  But here and years later, Thomas was ready to sacrifice his life for Jesus

In John 13:37 Simon Peter is recorded as saying, “LORD, WHY CAN’T I FOLLOW YOU NOW?  I WILL LAY DOWN MY LIFE FOR YOU.” I grant you that Peter’s courage deserted him a few hours later when he three times denied even knowing Jesus.  Tradition tells us that years later, Peter refused to share His Lord’s form of death and asked to be crucified upside down.

Whether our sacrifices are heroic or mundane, we move from self-centeredness to self-sacrifice as we mature spiritually. Paul demonstrated great self-sacrifice in his attitude toward worldly things (7-8).  WHATEVER WAS TO MY PROFIT I NOW CONSIDER LOSS FOR THE SAKE OF CHRIST.  I CONSIDER EVERYTHING A LOSS COMPARED TO THE SURPASSING GREATNESS OF KNOWING CHRIST JESUS MY LORD.  The words PROFIT and LOSS are key in vs. 7+8.

In vs. 4-6 Paul listed his reasons to have CONFIDENCE IN THE FLESH.  – He recites his religious history as if it were important in order to prove that it isn’t.  He’s effectively saying, “If there was ever anyone who deserved salvation by satisfying the Law, I’d be the guy.”  His religious achievements and circumstances were the things others might see as “profiting” Paul.

In contrast, the word LOSS sums up the stuff Paul gave up in order to have faith in Christ instead.  The word PROFIT is actually in the plural form in the original language: “profits.”  But the word LOSS is singular.  It’s as if Paul dumped all his achievements and advantages into a single trash can and declared them together a LOSS.  In order to achieve his goals, Paul had to dump the junk that kept him from Jesus.

Paul was clearly thinking about Jesus when he wrote, FOR WHOSE SAKE I HAVE LOST ALL THINGS (8).  This statement elaborates on verse seven, explaining that Paul made this essential sacrifice for Jesus’ sake.  As he explained in 1 Corinthians 13:3, self-sacrifice not done in love is worthless.  Paul is establishing his sacrifice as worthwhile

The phrase I CONSIDER THEM RUBBISH (8) is a stronger condemnation than LOSS.  The word RUBBISH is a polite translation; the literal translation of Paul’s choice of Greek words is “dung.”  I was amused to see one commentary placed a picture of an outdoor latrine in the city of Philippi next to this verse.  A picture is worth a thousand words and conveys emotion pretty well too.

  1. Paul’s life goals evidence spiritual maturity.

Goal #1 = KNOWING CHRIST JESUS MY LORD (8).

Biblically, KNOWING is not just “book smarts,” but includes knowledge gained by experience.  Paul’s goal was to know Jesus by living with Him.  Daily living is supposed to be ongoing experiences of God at work in our lives, personal experiences of His presence.

Goal #2 = Receive true righteousness by FAITH (9).

True righteousness is both salvation and the godly lifestyle that goes with it.  It is not something we create ourselves or by keeping the Old Testament Law, it is something we receive from God by faith.

Paul’s desire was to be FOUND in Christ.  It is as if he is picturing Judgment Day and declares here his hope that his name will appear in the Book of Life, the list of those who are genuinely God’s people.

Goal #3 = Know the power of His RESURRECTION (10).

Jesus conquered death through the power of God the Father.  His Resurrection is the most important display of divine power.  This is not only a historic event, however, it is a power for living every day.

Goal #4 = THE FELLOWSHIP OF SHARING IN HIS SUFFERINGS, BECOMING LIKE HIM IN HIS DEATH (10).

I don’t often see t word FELLOWSHIP combined with suffering and DEATH.  This is another way of saying that Paul desired to FOUND in Christ.  Shared experiences (good and bad) are a form of FELLOWSHIP that can bond people together.  This is also true of our relationship with Jesus Christ.

Without actually dying on a cross, how can we become like Jesus IN HIS DEATH?  In our living, we demonstrate the sacrificial purpose of Jesus’ death to help others find eternal life too.

Goal #5 = SOMEHOW, TO ATTAIN TO THE RESURRECTION FROM THE DEAD (11).

The word SOMEHOW seems to imply Paul felt some uncertainty about whether he was saved or not.  My guess is he’s saying, “I can’t save myself, but SOMEHOW God can.”  Paul refers to the promise of eternal life as THE RESURRECTION FROM THE DEAD.  Notice that is a singular event.

We live and die to attain eternal life.

          The Church in America has, for the last sixty years, become more about self-improve-ment than self-sacrifice.  We’ve gone from being crucified with Christ and dying to self, to settling for a “spiritual makeover.”  We are content with an appearance of godliness but miss t power because we won’t pay t price.

What is the price?  Jesus said, “IF ANYONE WOULD COME AFTER ME, HE MUST DENY HEIMSELF AND TAKE UP HIS CROSS DAILY AND FOLLOW ME.  FOR WHOEVER WANTS TO SAVE HIS LIFE WILL LOSE IT, BUT WHOEVER LOSES HIS LIFE FOR ME WILL SAVE IT.”  (Luke 9:23-24)

The question this morning is not whether or not you want to go to heaven: the question is, “What’s it worth to you to get there?”  A paradox of faith is that we cannot earn or buy our way into heaven and yet, it requires the sacrifice of everything, giving even life itself over to God and His direction.

Did Paul achieve these goals?  Not in this life, of course.  These goals are aimed at heaven, not the horizon.  As Paul wrote in verse twelve, NOT THAT I HAVE ALREADY OBTAINED ALL THIS, OR HAVE ALREADY BEEN MADE PERFECT, BUT I PRESS ON TO TAKE HOLD OF THAT FOR WHICH CHRIST JESUS TOOK HOLD OF ME.  In this life, God calls us to PRESS ON, even though we know the fulfillment of these goals lie beyond the reach of our earthly years.  We are to continue to obey, continue to grow, continue to mature as the years roll on.  This life is precious and not to be wasted on self-centeredness.  Instead, we are to spend our days investing in eternity by means of the sacrifices we make in love and in the name of Jesus Christ.

Saved and Sure of It

SavedByGrace

<Image retrieved from https://whataboutjesus.com/saved-by-grace/ on 1/29/18.>

(Please read Titus 3:1-15 in your approved version of the Bible.  I’ve used the NIV.)

We are saved in order to do good works.

          I came across an article whose title caught my eye, “Three Words that Kill Careers.”  That was something I had to read; after all, who wants to kill their career by accidentally saying the wrong three words.

In this article, James Michael Lafferty drew on his experience in the “human resource” side of business to identify the three words that bosses hate to hear.  There’s nothing wrong with the words, per se, just the attitude they betray.

The words are “I know that.”  Those three words reveal two issues that impede success.  The first is “coachability.”  People who think they know it all don’t take direction and worse, have quit learning, growing, and adapting.

The second issue is that in spite of the appearance of braggadocio, people who say “I know that” frequently are trying to cover up impaired self-esteem.  Taken together, the words “I know that” can indicate a person who doesn’t know and doesn’t want to know.

Managers want people who are teachable and adaptable.  I’d say Jesus does too.  “Know-it-alls” are the opposite of children, who are often the epitome of teachability and adaptability.  In Luke 18:17, Jesus said, “TRULY I TELL YOU, ANYONE WHO WILL NOT RECEIVE THE KINGDOM OF GOD LIKE A LITTLE CHILD WILL NEVER ENTER IT.”

REVIEW:

  1. How we get saved.
  2. How unsaved folk act.

NEW:

  1. How saved folk act.

We have a positive social presence. This presence is defined by nine virtues that are counter-points to the nine vices we detailed previously in section two.

The first virtue is to be SUBJECT/RULERS & AUTHORITIES (1).

Titus pastored a church on the island of Crete.  People there were notorious for being rebellious, so they needed this reminder to respect their leaders (see Romans 13:1-7 and 1 Peter 2:13-17).

In the Greek, the word SUBJECT indicates a voluntary submission.  Good behavior is a choice believers make, one will reinforce their witness.  Contrarily, bad behavior will ruin or at least make suspect an otherwise good witness.

The second virtue is to be OBEDIENT (1).  This is an obvious virtue if a person is truly subject to leaders.

The third virtue is so important, Paul was lead to record it three times; believers are READY TO DO GOOD (1, 8+14).  The full measure of good citizenship is not just obedience.  The best citizens are those who look for opportunities to do good.  Doing good is one-half the definition of moral behavior.  The other half (the more common one) is avoiding evil (as per the next virtue).

Fourth, avoiding SLANDER (2) is an example of the “negative” half of moral living.  Good people avoid doing bad things; actions and attitudes God has prohibited, identifying them as sins.  As we learned in part two, SLANDER is a sin whether the truth is being spoken or not.  What makes it sinful is more the motive than the content.  It is a sinfully-motivated act to intentionally steal respect from another person’s reputation.

The command to BE PEACEABLE (2) is the fifth virtue.  In a conflict, a PEACEABLE person is more concerned about the relationship than about getting their way.  God’s people seek ways to keep lines of communication open and are slow to give up on people or demonstrate prejudice.  This Greek word literally means “refusing to fight.”  This fits Jesus’ teaching in Matthew 5:39 = “But I tell you, do not resist an evil person. If anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to them the other cheek also.”

Sixth, BE CONSIDERATE (2).  Here again we come to the matter of priorities; the correct order is God first, others second, self last.  In order to be CONSIDERATE, we must learn empathy; to imagine yourself in the place of the other person and ask, “How would I want to be treated?”

The seventh virtue is ALWAYS GENTLE TO EVERYONE (2).  Gentleness is the opposite of aggressiveness and tempers assertiveness.  It is being reasonable and is flows from the consideration also mentioned in this verse.

This word is translated in other versions as “true humility.”  Either way, we’re describing the kind of personality that makes self-sacrifices in order to make friends.

An eighth virtue is AVOID divisions.  This is the lengthiest of the virtue descriptions.  The Greek word for AVOID literally means “to turn around.”  God’s people are to avoid divided situations and perpetrators guilty of creating division.  Paul named two things as examples of what to avoid; FOOLISH CONTROVERSIES and divisive persons (“heretics”).

FOOLISH CONTROVERSIES (9) are FOOLISH because of the subject matter and/or the persons involved: there are ungodly and unwise.  Paul offered three examples

The first example is GENEALOGIES.  Even today, people sometimes try to make themselves seem more important by claiming they are related to someone who is famous.  Such persons naturally try to outdo one another and arguments ensue.  In Jesus’ time, some Jews wanted to trace their ancestry back to Abraham to justify themselves (see Matthew 3:9 and John 8:33-40).

The second example is ARGUMENTS.  Personally, I think this term covers disputes about trivial matters.  Sometimes we try to make things sound important by casting them as a matter of principle, but in actual fact, they don’t amount to much.

In my experience, ARGUMENTS are ultimately over the question of who is in charge.  When we have opposing notions, who gets to decide what we do?  The answer is obvious if we truly are SUBJECT TO RULERS & AUTHORITIES and are OBEDIENT.

The third example is QUARRELS ABOUT THE LAW.  Jewish teachers had filled books with interpretations and applications of the Law.  As a former Pharisee, Paul would have plenty of personal experience of such QUARRELS.  Similar to ARGUMENTS, I believe QUARRELS are usually over secondary or trivial issues; they rarely involve core doctrine.

The other way to avoid division is to warn and discipline DIVISIVE persons (10); try to save them from themselves.  The word DIVISIVE is translated from the Gk word hairetikos; the word from which we get our English word, “heretic.”  This word literally means “able to choose” and is found only here in the entire New Testament.

“Able to choose” sounds like our usual definition of freedom, but choosing the way of sin is a loss of the true freedom in Christ. This is someone who rejects authority and lives to please themselves.

Another way to translate this word might be “opinionated.” We’re familiar with a “know-it-all,” the person whose motto is “I’ve made up my mind, don’t try to confuse me with the truth.”  Such persons can easily have a divisive effect on a church.  In churches, such people twist Scripture to excuse their attitudes and actions but are never transformed by it.

Two warnings ought to be enough for even the worst know-it-all.  The purpose of the warnings is to reclaim the DIVISIVE PERSON from sin.  Love does not let people continue in sin.  It finds a way to gently but firmly confront sin with the hope of reconciling the DIVISIVE PERSON to the church. (See Galatians 6:1.)

HAVE NOTHING TO DO WITH THEM is both a means of discipline and a way to protect the public image and spiritual vitality of the church.  (See Matthew 18:15-17; 1 Corinthians 5; and 1 Timothy 1:18-20 for more information about church discipline.)  Exclusion is the last resort.  Valid attempts at reconciliation must been made first.  If the DIVISIVE PERSON refuses correction, the church must end all ARGUMENT by refusing any further discussion.  The public image and the unity of the church are more important than one person whose behavior is divisive.

The ninth and final virtue is the most important; LOVE.  God’s people are to LOVE each other (15).  Love, after all, COVERS A MULTITUDE OF SINS, according to 1 Peter 4:8.

In addition to a positive social presence, God’s people are to have a redemptive witness. That means we aren’t to just mill about until someone notices us.  Instead, we live in a way that actively reaches out to the unsaved world around us.  Paul described this witness in three ways.

The first description is found in verse eight: STRESS THESE THINGS.  Right belief and right behavior are two sides of the same coin; you can’t have one without the other.  This is a TRUSTWORTHY SAYING because Paul stresses both.  Titus is to be confident in his leadership because his teaching and his living are grounded in the truth of God’s word.  He needs to STRESS these truths rather than allow himself to be stressed about things of lesser value.

The second description revisits the third virtue; DEVOTE THEMSELVES TO DOING WHAT IS GOOD (1, 8+14).  DEVOTE implies a commitment that trumps self-centeredness.  In verse fourteen Paul offered two examples of what is GOOD.

The first example is his call TO PROVIDE FOR URGENT NEEDS.   Based on verse thirteen, we understand that Paul’s immediate concern was that Zenas and Apollos were supported materially and spiritually; that Titus’ congregation provide them EVERYTHING THEY NEED.  But the word URGENT implies that believers distinguish themselves by service to the most needy people.

The second example is to NOT LIVE UNPRODUCTIVE LIVES (14). The Bible talks about “fruit” as produced by godly living (see Matthew 7:15-20 and Galatians 5:22-23).  This is becoming more like Jesus Christ.  That is one kind of FRUIT.

In Matthew 28:19-20 we are commanded to MAKE DISCIPLES as we go about daily life.  Discipling is another kind of FRUIT.  These two kinds of productivity are not optional; God expects His people to produce good works in themselves and others.

The third example is in verse eight: THESE THINGS ARE EXCELLENT AND PROFITABLE FOR EVERYONE.  Even the most jaded and pessimistic person must admit that LOVE is better than hate and GRACE than law.  They also have a value because they are part of His character; we are to follow His example.  Virtuous living benefits all folk & is more likely to be respected & appreciated.

We are saved in order to do good works.

Being devoted to doing good and seeking the things that are excellent and profitable for all will not happen by accident.  It also will not happen on our own strength.  It happens as we live in faith with God’s Spirit in charge of our will, words, and works.  Pray your way to a better day!

Unsaved and Showing It

Please read Titus 3:1-15 in your Bible.   This is the second of three messages on this chapter.

We are saved in order to do good works.

Being a father and being gifted with an exceptional sense of humor, I was naturally interested when I saw an internet article on funniest Dad Jokes.  Before we get to today’s message, I’d like to share a small part of this feast of funny.

Dad complained of tooth pain. When asked if he’d made an appointment to see the dentist, he replied, “Yes, at tooth-thirty!”

“You hear about the guy who invented Lifesavers? They say he made a mint.”

When the cashier at the grocery store asked if he would like the milk in a bag dad replied, “No, just leave it in the carton!”

While watching commercials, dad said aloud, “Why did the Clydesdale give the pony a glass of water?”  The family knew better than to answer, so dad continued, “Because he was a little horse!”

During a serious conversation of family history one dad said, “I used to have a job at a calendar factory but they fired me because I took a couple of days off.”

My kids can tell you I enjoy comparing dreams.  On a similar occasion one dad said, “I had a dream that I was a muffler last night. I woke up exhausted!”

Dad was trying to help Junior with his math homework and said, “You know, 5/4 of people admit that they’re bad with fractions.”

And finally, dads like to joke by conjuring up their own fake news.  For example, “Did you hear the news? FedEx and UPS are merging. They’re going to go by the name Fed-Up from now on.’”

I admit there were a few groaners there.  My plan is to offer a light-hearted example of how we can make life difficult for one another.  I wanted to start this way because the subject matter of today’s message is deadly serious.

Someone said at a recent Bible study, “You don’t hear preachers talk about sin much anymore.”  Today sin is going to be our exclusive subject.  As we begin, all I ask is that each of use this biblical truth first as a mirror to our own souls, and only after truthful introspection, turn our gaze to the lives of others.

REVIEW:

  1. How we get saved.

NEW:

  1. How unsaved folk act.

We’ve been saved from these behaviors.  AT ONE TIME WE TOO WERE…Paul contrasted the believer’s “BC” (“Before Christ”) personality with his “WC” (“With Christ”) personality after being saved.  Sometimes we need to restore our perspective by taking a look backward to see how far we’ve come.

The vice of foolishness (3).  In the Bible, a fool is someone who displays their ungodliness in antisocial, unwise, and self-destructive behavior.  Rejecting God, such people lack the Holy Spirit who gives wisdom we need to discern good and evil and the motive to choose the good.  In Ephesians 4:18 we see the cause of foolishness: They are darkened in their understanding and separated from the life of God because of the ignorance that is in them to the hardening of their hearts.

Disobedience (3) is a vice.  Being under the influence of their sin nature, such a person disobeys God’s will for them.  Disobedience is sin.  Sin is open rebellion against God; the penalty is death.

While the other eight vices listed here might be concealed for a time, disobedience is impossible to hide very long.  People can be overtly – even defiantly – disobedient, proud of themselves or covertly disobedient, covering it up by making excuses for their misbehavior.

Being thoroughly DECEIVED (3) about the truth of God is a vice.  Only believers have the Holy Spirit and the wisdom he provides. Without the Spirit, a person cannot truly understand the word of God or do His will.  This is the IGNORANCE of which we read in Ephesians  4:18.

It is a vice to be ENSLAVED BY ALL KINDS OF PASSIONS AND PLEASURES (3).  Without the Spirit to reform their thoughts and affections, a person is bound to be attracted to things that stimulate them, but are bad for them.  For example, worldly things are never satisfying; they merely increase our appetite for something new.  (See Romans 1.)  This is ironic, because we naturally think being able to do whatever you want is freedom.  The truth is, it is slavery to one’s own PASSIONS and PLEASURES and to those who sell them.  It’s like an addict enslaved to his addiction.

MALICE (3) is one of the more obvious vices.  This word centers on the emotions that motivate people to do evil.  It reveals a soul that has no empathy or sympathy; no consideration of the effect of their actions on others.

ENVY (3) can also be translated as “jealousy.”  It is the vice of valuing things more highly than people.

WARPED (11) can also translated as “perverted.”  This vice is being exercised when a person is a twister of words and misuses their influence to bend others to their will to do evil. Thus, the word WARPED is a condemnation of their character and thinking.

The word SINFUL (11) sounds like a combination of all vices wrapped together.  It describes the orientation of a disobedient and disrespectful life wasted SINFUL decisions, defying God.

Not content to be evil alone, SINFUL people seek to influence others to join them.  Evil naturally seeks to replicate itself (“misery loves company), but is more intentional in the DIVISIVE PERSON mentioned in verse ten.

Such purveyors of vice are SELF-CONDEMNED (11).  Attitudes are manifest in actions and eventually even the most carefully-crafted façade will fall.  Evil actions betray an evil heart.  However, a DIVISIVE PERSON may be so convincing they’ve fooled themselves.  Sincerity is a virtue until a person is sincerely wrong.  This is another reason for the occasional rebuke; the person may not see the error and danger of their ways.

This passage condemns stubbornness and close-mindedness that is unwilling to even consider that they may be wrong or need to change.  The ninth vice is important to our understanding of the justice of God.  In His judgment, God condemns people who are already SELF-CONDEMNED.  Given freedom to choose, they are responsible for their own condemnation by the choices they made.

The passage describes two effects of evil behaviors.  There are surely others, but these are given to aid our discernment.

The first is BEING HATED AND HATING ONE ANOTHER (3).  The phrase BEING HATED is translated from the Greek word stugetoi, which sounds a lot like our English word “stooge,” but there’s no known connection between the two.  This word refers to a person so degraded by evil that others can’t bear to be around them.

The phrase HATING ONE ANOTHER indicates an aspect of sin nature; while people still enslaved to it may congregate and even cooperate, that only happens when their self-interests happen to coincide.  Even then, they distrust and dislike one another.  True relationships are impossible for such people.

The second is more damning: THESE ARE UNPROFITABLE AND USELESS (9).   Contrary to the benefits of virtues described in verse eight, these vices are worthless and harmful.  It helps to remember that righteous behavior and true belief is good for us, body and soul.  God calls us to Him because He is the ultimate good.  It’s also good to recognize that biblically, enlightened self-interest (i.e., a desire to earn heavenly rewards) is a legitimate motive if other reasons to do good temporarily fail to move us.

We are saved in order to do good works.

In summing up the list of vices, the Zondervan Bible Commentary wrote, “But man’s depravity proves no obstacle to God.”  (P. 1524.)  That is the good news this morning.  While it is painful and bewildering that people WANT to act this way, we can be encouraged to know that the worst evil people can do is no challenge at all to God’s will to make good arise and triumph.  We must trust God and join Him in bringing about the most loving outcome in every situation.

St. Francis of Assisi is quoted as saying, “Above all the grace and the gifts that Christ gives to his beloved is that of overcoming self.”

Whenever we read lists of sins in the Bible, it may be our natural inclination to think of “Old So-and-so” instead of self.  That is definitely not our first step.

Remember the example of Jesus’ disciples at the last supper.  When Jesus announced there was a betrayer among them, all of them asked, “Lord, is it I?”  Eleven of them knew they had no plans to betray Jesus and yet they asked the question.

That’s humility, folks.  It’s resisting our natural urge to resort to defensiveness and allowing God to shine the light of the word into the parts of our lives that we prefer to keep shrouded in darkness.

Let us ask, “Is it I, Lord?”

PREVIEW:

  1. How saved folk act.

Saved and Showing It (1 of 3)

Please read Titus 3:1-15 in your preferred Bible.  I’ve used the NIV this week.

We are saved to do good works.

Salvation is by grace.  It is not earned. The devotional magazine Our Daily Bread gave this definition of grace; GRACE IS EVERYTHING FOR NOTHING TO THOSE WHO DON’T DESERVE ANYTHING.

(Our Daily Bread, Sept.-Nov. 1997, page for October 31, retrieved from http://www.sermonsearch.com/sermon-illustrations/2873/a-definition/ on 1/12/18.)
“A story is told about Fiorello LaGuardia, mayor of New York City during the worst days of the Great Depression and all of WWII.  One bitterly cold night in January of 1935, the mayor turned up at a night court that served the poorest ward of the city. LaGuardia dismissed the judge for the evening and took over the bench himself.

“A tattered old woman was brought before him, charged with stealing a loaf of bread. She told LaGuardia that her daughter’s husband had deserted her, her daughter was sick, and her two grandchildren were starving. But the shopkeeper refused to drop the charges.

“‘It’s a real bad neighborhood, your Honor.’ the man told the mayor. ‘She’s got to be punished to teach other people around here a lesson.’

“LaGuardia sighed. He turned to the woman and said ‘I’ve got to punish you. The law makes no exceptions; ten dollars or ten days in jail.’  But even as he pronounced sentence, the mayor was already reaching into his pocket. He extracted a bill and said: ‘Here is the ten dollar fine which I now remit; and furthermore I am going to fine everyone in this courtroom fifty cents for living in a town where a person has to steal bread so that her grandchildren can eat. Mr. Baliff, collect the fines and give them to the defendant.’

“The following day the New York City newspapers reported that $47.50 was turned over to a bewildered old lady who had stolen a loaf of bread to feed her starving grandchildren, fifty cents of that amount being contributed by the red-faced grocery store owner, while some seventy petty criminals, people with traffic violations, and New York City policemen, each of whom had just paid fifty cents for the privilege of doing so, gave the mayor a standing ovation.

(Brennan Manning, The Ragmuffin Gospel, Multnomah, 1990, pp. 91-2, retrieved from http://www.sermonsearch.com/sermon-illustrations/2891/mayor-laguardia/ on 1/12/18.)
1. How we get saved.

Paul reveals four reasons God had for reasons for saving us.

The first is KINDNESS (verse four).  Historically speaking, salvation started in the mind of God.  He acted first to save us.  We saw this truth previously in Titus 2:11 =THE GRACE OF GOD HAS APPEARED THAT OFFERS SALVATION TO ALL PEOPLE.

God hates sin but He loves sinners and works to bring all of us to salvation.  In Romans 5:8 it is written, But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us.

KINDNESS is this attitude manifest in good deeds.  It bestows forgiveness and blesses others.

The second reason is God’s great LOVE (verse four).  This is God’s prime motive and the prime aspect of His character.  All other aspects of His personality are expressions of His LOVE.  Love is an unconditional state or attitude and action that seeks the spiritual maturity of the beloved.  That is God’s character and how God has acted toward us.

This is not one of the usual three words for LOVE in the NT.  This is the Gk word philanthropia, which meant “love for humanity.”  It appears only in this verse.  This is LOVE directed at the welfare of others, especially supporting people in need.

A third reason is God’s MERCY (5).  Because we are unable – on our own – to meet God’s standard of righteousness, MERCY is an absolute necessity; otherwise we have no hope.  MERCY makes a way for people who have no way of their own.  God decided to show us MERCY; we did not deserve it.  God’s MERCY is the standard for our treatment of one another; as we pray every Sunday and Wednesday, “forgive us as we forgive others.”

The fourth reason isn’t really a reason but a clarification that merit is NOT a reason: God did NOT save us BECAUSE OF THE RIGHTEOUS THINGS WE HAVE DONE (verse five).  We are not saved BY good works; we are saved FOR good works.  In Isaiah 64:6 the prophet wrote that the most righteous things we do based on our own strength are like FILTHY RAGS; worthless.  Personal merit is simply not a factor at this stage.  We do not understand the grace of God if we believe we can earn salvation by good deeds or if we believe we can lose salvation by doing evil.

Through Paul, the Holy Spirit reveals not only why God saved us, but also how God saved us.

The first of these three salvation acts is THE WASHING OF REBIRTH (verse five).  The literal meaning of the Greek word for WASHING is “bathing.”  This implies a total cleansing; the whole person is made free from the dirty guilty mark of sin.

REBIRTH refers to Jesus’ teaching to Nicodemus in John 3; a person must be “born again” to be saved.  It is a restart to life, an opportunity to live right.  Baptism by immersion is the way we enact this WASHING, demonstrating outwardly that this inward change has happened.

The WASHING refers to the moment of salvation, the time we genuinely receive Jesus as Savior, the RENEWAL to the life-long process of sanctification, where the Spirit helps us become more like Jesus.

Another means of salvation is the RENEWAL OF THE HOLY SPIRIT (verse five).  God does not expect us to find out all this on our own.  He sends the Holy Spirit to unsaved folk to direct them to the truth and bring them to a point of decision.  I would say the term “Filling of the Spirit” is equivalent to RENEWAL.

A third thing God did to save us was that He JUSTIFIED us BY HIS GRACE (verse seven).  GRACE is undeserved favor as we learned last week.  It come from God’s LOVE and is expressed in His MERCY to us.  The word JUSTIFIED refers to our legal standing.  God graciously removes the judgment of death that we deserve.  When God justified us He declared us to be righteous because the righteousness of Jesus covers our sin.  He also makes us His children by the “legality” of adoption: HEIRS OF THE HOPE OF ETERNAL LIFE (see Romans 8:15 and Ephesians 1:5).

Our part is simply having faith: Trusting GOD (verse eight) that all His promises will be fulfilled in our experience.

Finally, Paul elaborated two things that salvation has done for us.

First, in recognition of authentic faith POURED OUT the Holy Spirit GENEROUSLY (verse six).  Notice the Holy Spirit works on us in both our “BC” (Before Christ) and “WC” (With Christ) states.  In our “BC” state the Spirit brings conviction of the guilt of sin and guides us to believers who will witness the truth to us.  In our “WC” state the Spirit provides understanding of the word of God, strength to perform the will of God and Gifts to enable us to work together to see the Fruits of the Spirit manifest in each believer.

GENEROUSLY can also be translated “richly.”  The point is that God gives us all we need to succeed in our spiritual life.  Failure can’t be blamed on Him.  Notice that all three members of the Trinity are mentioned in this passage and all three have a role to play in our salvation.

Second, as already observed, God saved us so WE MIGHT BECOME HEIRS HAVING THE HOPE OF ETERNAL LIFE (verse seven). Obviously, this looks to the future; it is a HOPE.  But our status as HEIRS is in the present moment.  So our faith looks ahead to a glorious future but also confers on us the privileges and responsibilities of being part of God’s family.

We are saved to do good works.

There was a beautiful summer day when a Baptist church had scheduled baptisms down by the riverside.  A drunk stumbled on to the Sunday afternoon service and proceeded to make a pest of himself.
The minister turned to the drunk and said, “Mister, Are you ready to find Jesus?”      The drunk noticed the preacher for the first time and said, “Yessir, I sure am.”
The pastor motioned him to come into the river and then the minister then dunked the fellow under the water and pulled him right back up. “Have you found Jesus?” the preacher asked.
“No, I didn’t!” gasped the drunk.
The preacher dunked him again, this time for quite a bit longer.  Bringing him up, the preacher said, “Now, brother, have you found Jesus?”
“No, I did not Preacher.”
In disgust, the preacher baptized him a third time holding the man under for a bit longer still.  When he brought him out of the water, he inquired, “Have you found Jesus this time?”

The drunk spat out a bit of river water and said, “If it’s all the same to you, preacher, I’d like to quit lookin’!”

(Adapted from  https://www.sermoncentral.com/illustrations/sermon-illustration-jeff-strite-humor-baptism-2578?+ref=TextIllustrationDetails, retrieved on 1/12/18.)

PREVIEW:

  1. How unsaved folk act.
  2. How saved folk act.